Insights on Law & Society: The United Nations & the Rule of Law (Vol.11-No.3)

    Insights on Law & Society: The United Nations & the Rule of Law (Vol.11-No.3)

    Insights on Law & Society: The United Nations & the Rule of Law (Vol.11-No.3)

    Insights on Law & Society: The United Nations and the Rule of Law

    Volume 11, no. 3, Spring 2011

     

    Insights on Law & Society is one-stop reading for teachers of law, civics, government, or social studies. Each issue takes on a topic, then provides articles written by experts in the field, as well as teaching ideas for incorporating the content into the classroom. Also in each issue, popular features such as Perspectives, which presents an issue from multiple views; and Profile, which offers a quick interview with a figure, provide additional instructional support.

     

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    Insights on Law & Society: The United Nations and the Rule of Law

    Volume 11, no. 3, Spring 2011

     

    This 32-page issue of Insights includes:

    The Role of the United Nations in International Law

    Kelly-Kate Pease provides an overview of how the United Nations functions as an intergovernmental organization that creates and implements international law.

     

    The U.N. Security Council: The Most Powerful Organ in History

    Kristen Boon explores how the U.N. Security Council has become what some describe as “the most powerful organ in history,” creating international policy and mandating international action.

     

    International Criminal Court Bringing World Promised Justice?

    T. Markus Funk traces the development of the International Criminal Court and discusses current challenges facing the court, charged with hearing some of the world’s worst cases.

     

    Perspectives: What challenges will the United Nations face over the next 20 years?

    Several experts describe challenges facing the United Nations, including preventing humanitarian crises, harnessing nuclear technology, trusting the international community, and working with outside practitioners to achieve rule of law goals.

     

    Students in Action: Civic Voices Profile Activists for Change Around the World

    David Stieber highlights the Civic Voices: An International Democracy Memory Bank Project, which he has used with his own students.

     

    Learning Gateways: The United States and the International Criminal Court

    In this lesson, students compare the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights to excerpts from the Rome Statute, and then debate whether or not the United States should ratify the treaty.

    Product Details

    ISBN

    1531-2461

    Product Code

    49702001103PDF

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