CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Amid COVID-19, ABA white-collar crime conference goes virtual

May 18. 2020

For the first time in its 34-year history, the ABA Criminal Justice Section’s National Institute on White Collar Crime will be held as an all-digital presentation due to the coronavirus pandemic. The annual conference will be an eight-part, four-day virtual webinar series spanning four consecutive Wednesdays — June 3, 10, 17 and 24. The webinars have been developed from content created for the canceled 34th White Collar Crime National Institute that had been scheduled in March in San Diego.

The National Institute on White Collar Crime programs will discuss the First Step Act, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, and ethics among other topics.

The National Institute on White Collar Crime programs will discuss the First Step Act, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, and ethics among other topics.

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The institute will bring together representatives from the corporate sector, top government enforcement and regulators, prosecutors and the federal judiciary to discuss updates on new developments and strategies in white-collar law.

A highlight will be a livestreamed panel discussion, “A Conversation with the Enforcers and Regulators.” The panel on June 17 from 2:10–3:10 p.m. ET will focus on the government’s enforcement priorities and feature Brian Benczkowski, chief of the Department of Justice Criminal Division; James M. McDonald, enforcement director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission; and Steven R. Peikin, co-director of enforcement at the Securities and Exchange Commission. 

Other program topics to be covered include the First Step Act, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, ethics and health care fraud. Also covered will be the trend of enhanced enforcement in traditionally self-regulated sectors, focusing on the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the Varsity Blues college admissions bribery scandal in which 33 actresses, business leaders, lawyers and other wealthy parents were charged.

The Criminal Justice Section, which is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year, has more than 16,000 members, including prosecutors, private defense counsel, appellate and trial judges, law professors, correctional and law enforcement personnel, law students, public defenders and other criminal justice professionals.

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