HEALTH CARE FRAUD

DOJ Assistant AG Matthew Miner says health fraud enforcement top priority

Health care fraud is a form of white collar crime that impacts everyone and it remains a top priority of the U.S. Department of Justice, Deputy Assistant Attorney General Matthew S. Miner said during his keynote speech on May 9 at the American Bar Association’s 29th Annual National Institute on Health Care Fraud in New Orleans.

Deputy Assistant Attorney General Matthew S. Miner

Deputy Assistant Attorney General Matthew S. Miner

“Through robust enforcement and sensible policies, the department is tackling the issue head on – holding offenders to account and encouraging companies to take steps to prevent, detect, report and remediate wrongdoing,” said Miner, who supervises the Criminal Division’s Fraud and Appellate Sections.

Miner noted that DOJ in the past two years has had what he termed “historic takedowns” for health care fraud. In 2017, 400 defendants – including 56 doctors – were charged with more than $1.3 billion in health care fraud. In 2018, more than 600 defendants were charged – including 76 doctors – with more than $2 billion in medical fraud. And just last month, the department cracked down on an evolving area – telemedicine fraud – charging 24 defendants, including executives of five telemedicine companies, for their alleged participation in health care fraud schemes involving more than $1.2 billion in losses.

“The department is fully committed to white collar enforcement, and any fraudster who seeks quarter behind a perception or false rumor of decreased enforcement will be sorely disappointed,” Miner said.

The institute brings together health care attorneys, regulators, compliance professionals, state and federal prosecutors, criminal defense attorneys and the best subject-matter experts on health care fraud detection and prevention, the current opioid epidemic and health care regulatory compliance.

The event was sponsored by the Criminal Justice Section  and ABACLE.

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