CRIMINAL JUSTICE SECTION

White collar criminals still pursued, says ex-DOJ official

Despite published reports to the contrary, there was not a downturn in white collar crime enforcement by the U.S. Department of Justice in 2018, according to the former head of the agency’s Fraud Division. 

An expert panel discusses trial advocacy during the ABA Criminal Justice Section’s 33rd Annual National Institute on White Collar Crime

An expert panel discusses trial advocacy during the ABA Criminal Justice Section’s 33rd Annual National Institute on White Collar Crime

“In fact, there was an uptick in individual prosecutions,” Sandra Moser said during her keynote Q&A at the Women in White Collar Crime Luncheon on March 6 during the ABA Criminal Justice Section’s 33rd Annual National Institute on White Collar Crime in New Orleans. Moser headed the DOJ’s Fraud Division from 2017 until she left in January to join Quinn Emanuel to co-chair its white-collar management practice in Washington, D.C.

Moser said the perception in a decline of white collar prosecutions might have been due in part to new policies and guidelines in corporate self-reporting. “Some of the policy changes I think can be viewed as somewhat friendly and welcoming to the business community in some ways,” she said.

More than 1,300 legal professionals attended the four-day conference, which featured 125 panelists, including top officials from the Justice Department, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Federal Trade Commission, Futures Trading Commission, federal judiciary, states attorneys general and general counsel of global corporations. Topics included the latest in enforcement of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and antitrust laws, money laundering and sentencing and its collateral consequences.

Related links: