There Are Many Faces to Depression and Many Paths to Recovery

Jeena Cho
We should be willing to acknowledge that even though we are lawyers, we are also human, subject to the human condition, which includes depression.

We should be willing to acknowledge that even though we are lawyers, we are also human, subject to the human condition, which includes depression.

fizkes via iStock

Lawyer Assistance Programs provide confidential services and support to judges, lawyers and law students who are facing substance use disorders or mental health issues. If you or someone you know is in need of assistance, contact your state or local LAP.

Even though I was a psychology major in college, it caught me off guard when my therapist said I had high-functioning depression. I didn’t feel sad, I just felt numb. I was emotionally detached from myself and others. Yet, I told myself I was fine because I woke up each morning, showered, got dressed, showed up to work, did everything I needed to, and went to the gym before heading home at the end of the day. Treatment involved a combination of talk therapy, a low-dose antidepressant for six months, and a lot of self-care.

When I am doing my presentations on lawyer well-being, I make a point to talk about the many faces of depression. Sure, for some, depression can look as you might imagine: the inability to function or fulfill one’s daily responsibilities and to be in a constant state of gloom. But this isn’t true for everyone. As you’ll see from the stories below, there are many faces to depression and many paths for getting better.

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