The Impostor in Your Office

Tyler Holmes
Find people you can open up to and then allow others to come to you.

Find people you can open up to and then allow others to come to you.

Klaus Vedfelt/DigitalVision via GettyImages

You got the undergraduate degree, the JD, a nice job, and yet, you still think someone is going to find out you’re a fraud, that you do not belong. My manager called me invaluable, and I still wonder if she or my organization’s board would agree if they saw what I do day-to-day. First described in a 1978 paper about 150 high-achieving women by Drs. Pauline R. Clance and Suzanne A. Imes, the impostor phenomenon or impostor syndrome are “a collection of feelings of inadequacy that persist despite evident success.” “Impostors” include Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor and roughly 70 percent of the population, men and women alike. Below, experts Dr. Andy Molinsky and Jaime McNalley share with TYL advice on how to handle impostor syndrome.

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