January 30, 2016

About the Contributors

Christopher A. Bracey is a Professor of Law at the George Washington University School of Law in Washington, D.C. He is an internationally recognized expert in the fields of U.S. race relations, individual rights, and criminal procedure.

Chad Flanders has taught at Saint Louis University School of Law since 2009. He teaches and writes in the areas of criminal law, constitutional law, and the philosophy of law.

Phillip Goff is an Associate Professor of Social Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles, on leave this year as a Visiting Scholar at the Harvard Kennedy School. He is the co-founder and president of the Center for Policing Equity.

Colin Gordon is Professor of History and Public Policy at the University of Iowa. He is the author of Growing Apart: A Political History of American Inequality (Institute for Policy Studies, 2013); and Mapping Decline: St. Louis and the Fate of the American City (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008).

Katherine Goldwasser is a Professor of Law at Washington University in Saint Louis. She specializes in the areas of criminal procedure and trial practice and regularly teaches courses in those areas, including a course in which she supervises students who work with prosecutors in the U.S. Attorney’s Offices for both the Eastern District of Missouri and the Southern District of Illinois.

Thomas B. Harvey is an attorney and the Executive Director and co-founder of ArchCity Defenders (ACD), a non-profit law firm providing holistic legal services to the indigent in the St. Louis region and pursuing policy advocacy and impact litigation arising from its direct legal services.

Kira Hudson Banks is an Assistant Professor in the department of psychology at Saint Louis University. Her research examines the experience of discrimination and its impact on mental health and intergroup relations.

Tracey L. Meares is the Walton Hale Hamilton Professor of Law at Yale Law School. She has served on two National Research Council Review Committees: one to review research on police policy and practices and another more recently to review the National Institute of Justice. In 2014 she was named by President Obama to join his newly created Task Force on 21st Century Policing.

Candice Norwood is a master’s student at American University studying international media, an interdisciplinary program that combines international relations and media production coursework. The majority of her academic research examines how modern news coverage and digital media shape race and gender relations.

Kimberly Jade Norwood is a Professor of Law at Washington University School of Law in Saint Louis. She teaches torts, products liability, race, education and the law, and education equality, justice, and reform. In 2007 she created a high school to law school pipeline program at Washington University School of Law, which has received both national and local acclaim and is still in operation.

Jason Q. Purnell, Ph.D., MPH, is Assistant Professor in the George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Faculty Director for Thriving Communities in the Center for Social Development, and Faculty Scholar in the Institute for Public Health at Washington University in St. Louis.

L. Song Richardson is a Professor of Law at the University of California, Irvine, School of Law. Her interdisciplinary research uses lessons from cognitive and social psychology to study criminal procedure, criminal law, and policing.

Brendan Roediger is a Professor of Law at Saint Louis University School of Law. He heads the school’s Civil Advocacy Clinic, which focuses on court-reform and the representation of low-income individuals in the St. Louis region.

Terry Smith is a Distinguished Research Professor at DePaul College of Law. A specialist in labor and employment law as well as voting rights, Professor Smith is the author of Barack Obama, Post-Racialism, and the New Politics of Triangulation (2012).

Vetta Sanders Thompson, Ph.D., is a Professor at Washington University in St. Louis, in the George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Public Health Program and Urban Studies Program.

Howard M. Wasserman is Professor of Law at FIU College of Law. He has been a visiting professor at Saint Louis University School of Law and Florida State University College of Law. He is the author of Understanding Civil Rights Litigation (2013).