Feature

Autonomous Vehicles and Parking: Preparing for a Bumpy Road Ahead

By Andrew Palmieri, Steven Dube, and Brandon Brauer

The United States has too much parking. Far too much. Approximately two years ago, Bloomberg’s City Lab estimated there may be as many as 2 billion spaces in the United States and only 250 million cars. Some cities like Seattle have more than five times the amount of parking spaces as households, and, in some cities, the ratio is even more lopsided. For example, Jackson, Wyoming, has approximately 100,000 parking spaces and only 10,000 residents. Parking lots also consume enormous amounts of land. Roughly 14 percent of the land within Los Angeles is dedicated to parking. Take a ride in an Uber anywhere past vacant office buildings, empty malls, or quiet city centers with stores going out of business, and it is easy to recognize that there is much less need for large parking lots and multistory garages than there was a few decades ago.

There is a sense of inevitability that autonomous vehicles will meaningfully change our cities and our lives—and our need for parking.

There is a sense of inevitability that autonomous vehicles will meaningfully change our cities and our lives—and our need for parking.

(Getty Images)

Premium Content For:
  • Real Property, Trust and Estate Law Section
Join - Now