GPSolo | Feature

Juries Are Always Listening, Even When You Are Not Speaking

Cedric Ashley

May it please the court, counsel, members of the jury. The evidence will show that for more than two years, my client—Christine Competent—was the sole female employee of a seven-member sales team. During that time, she suffered through a vile, pervasive, and hostile work environment simply because she was a woman. Crude jokes, pornographic images, and regular groping were as common as morning coffee. Christine reported this conduct to her supervisor, who responded simply with “boys will be boys.” A point came when Christine’s mind, body, and spirit could no longer handle this abuse. She suffered a nervous breakdown and has not been able to work since that day. Tragically, she has been diagnosed with PTSD, and she is a shell of the person she used to be. That’s why we are here today—because her team’s horrific behavior violated the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination. I’ll talk in detail about that later, but first let me tell you a little bit more about my client, her career, and the company that is responsible for the abuse she suffered.

The jury is always taking in verbal and nonverbal communications from you.

The jury is always taking in verbal and nonverbal communications from you.

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