In This Issue

Diversity & Inclusion

Honoring Abby

The Nashville Scene has recently dubbed civil rights attorney Abby Rubenfeld as “the warrior,” referencing her pivotal role in the recent marriage equality victory. Those of us who have known Abby for more than five minutes, and the more of us who have known of Abby and benefited from her hard work and dedication, congratulate the Nashville Scene for pointing out the obvious. With all due respect to the Nashville Scene (and seriously, major respect is due to the Scene for its outstanding homage to Abby), the term “warrior” is a grave understatement. Perhaps one of the best terms that could be used to describe Abby Rubenfeld is “champion.”

Diversity & Inclusion

History of Bullyproof

Bullyproof was the idea and creation of former YLD Chair Mario Sullivan, who at the ABA 2013 Annual Conference in San Francisco, launched Bullyproof as his featured 2013-14 ABA YLD Public Service Project. At the same Conference, the YLD Assembly unanimously approved and adopted YLD Resolution 6YL, which highlighted the history of the ABA’s efforts to address the growing bullying epidemic in the U.S. What’s more, the Resolution recommended that federal, state, territorial, and local officials and administrators specifically address bullying and make available programs like mentoring and counseling for students, teachers, administrators and families involved in bullying incidents.

Diversity & Inclusion

The Section of Civil Rights & Social Justice: 50th year of service to the ABA

The Section of Civil Rights & Social Justice is celebrating its 50th anniversary this bar year. Our original name—the Section of Individual Rights & Responsibility—was one forged in compromise. As noted by Former Chair, Father Robert Drinan, in a 1991 Human Rights Magazine article: “The name ‘Section of Individual Rights’ was chosen to avoid the anticipated resistance to the use of ‘civil rights.’ The term ‘Responsibilities’ was added on the floor of the House and was agreed to by the sponsors simply to avoid controversy and to ease the birth of the section.”