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Michigan

Ave Maria School of Law (Ann Arbor)

Contact/ Disability Resource Center

Disability Accommodations

It is the policy and practice of Ave Maria School of Law to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended by the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and state and local requirements regarding students with disabilities. Under these laws, no qualified individual with a disability shall be denied access to or participation in services, programs and activities of Ave Maria School of Law. More detailed information about our policy, including forms required to request an accommodation, is available at the following link:  Policy Regarding Students and Applicants with Disabilities.pdf

For accommodations, contact the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs (link to contacts)

Courses

Higher Education Law & Policy: Forty years ago, a handful of large institutions of higher education had in-house legal staff. Now all but the smallest schools do. However, in modern higher education, few major decisions are made without considering the layered set of statutes, regulations, case law, and institutional rules implemented to limit and address the legal consequences. The course will provide the history of higher education law, an overview of legal governance in higher education and how to weigh and balance the often-competing rights and responsibilities of institutions, faculty, staff, and students. Examples include: the tension between academic freedom and tenure; using affirmative action to create a diverse campus; creating an equitable and inclusive campus while also promoting free speech or the right to carry a weapon; and legal compliance Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), and Title IX; to name a few. The course will examine topics from a variety of perspectives to inform those who desire a role in general law practice, policy making, in-house university counsel, higher education administration, or as a member of the faculty.

Sports and Inequality: This seminar will examine legal and social implications of various forms of discrimination in both professional and amateur sports. Legal efforts to address discrimination in sports based on race, gender, disability, and sexual orientation will be discussed. Specifically, the seminar will dive into racial and gender inequities both on the field and in front offices, gender segregation and exclusion in professional sports, NCAA eligibility criteria, the effects and future of Title IX, sexual orientation discrimination in sports, and sports opportunities for people with disabilities. There will be class discussion postings, presentations, and a final paper and presentation to the class.

Employment Law: This is an introductory employment law course, which will begin with the foundations of employment law, including an examination of the employment relationship and terms and conditions of employment. A substantial portion of the course will cover federal legislation and related case law, such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).

Michigan State University College of Law (East Lansing)

Contact/ Disability Resource Center

The Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities

(Direct link)

RCPD assists students, faculty, and staff by maximizing ability and opportunity for full participation at MSU. If you are a student or employee at MSU, and you have a disability that substantially limits a major life activity, you can register with the RCPD and you may be eligible to receive accommodations. Please note this information is kept strictly confidential. Self-identification is voluntary. However, if you have a disability, not registering with the RCPD may delay or compromise the availability of accommodations. As many reasonable accommodations require significant pre-planning, registration with the RCPD prior to situations requiring accommodations is essential.

Bessey Hall
434 Farm Lane, #120
East Lansing, MI 48824-1033

Courses

Employment Law (511C): This is an introductory employment law course, which will begin with the foundations of employment law, including an examination of the employment relationship and terms and conditions of employment. A substantial portion of the course will cover federal legislation and related case law, such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).

Western Michigan University Cooley Law School (Lansing)

Contact/ Disability Resource Center

For accommodations, contact the Senior Director and Special Advisor to the President for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

https://www.cooley.edu/sites/default/files/media/docs/disability_access_guide.pdf

Courses

Federal Disabilities Law: Examines federal legislation, regulations, and case law affecting the rights of individuals with physical and mental disabilities. Special emphasis is placed on all components of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Other federal legislation surveyed in this course includes the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Fair Housing Amendments of 1988.

University of Detroit Mercy School of Law

Contact/ Disability Resource Center

Office of Student Accessibility Services 

The Office of Student Accessibility Services (SAS) works with each student individually to establish reasonable and appropriate accommodations for the purpose of eliminating environmental barriers impacting the student’s equitable access to the services, programs and activities at University of Detroit Mercy.

Accessibility is an essential feature of the Detroit Mercy campus and we strive to create an inclusive community for our students. Our belief in the dignity of each person, and through compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (1990) as amended in 2008, we strive to ensure that students with disabilities are provided the tools they need to fully access all aspects of student life inside and outside of the classroom.

McNichols Campus Library, Room 319
(Student Success Center)

Email: [email protected]

Fax:
 313-578-0342

Student Organizations

The Disability Law Association will work to create an open and accessible environment for students to raise awareness of disability rights in the University of Detroit Mercy Law community, the surrounding communities, the legal profession, and society as a whole. The organization will advocate for Disability rights and give a voice to those that do not have it. We will work to create an inclusive environment for all individuals be it regardless of disability. DLA will raise awareness and inclusivity by organizing activities that educate the community on all facets of disability law and rights while guiding them on how they can help. 

The Mental Health Association  strives to promote mental health awareness among our students and faculty by providing helpful tips and resources. Our Association is focused on encouraging students to prioritize their mental health for while they are in school and for their legal career. By reducing the stigma of mental illnesses and providing these resources, we hope that the next generation of lawyers will be better equipped to manage their mental health.

University of Michigan Law School (Ann Arbor)

Contact/ Disability Resource Center

Services for Students with Disabilities

Embedded in the strategic plan of the University of Michigan is a commitment to ensure equal opportunity for all individuals. Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) recognizes disability as an integral part of diversity and is committed to creating an inclusive and equitable educational environment for disabled students. SSD is a partner to students, faculty, and staff in the pursuit to develop leaders and citizens who will challenge the present and enrich the future.

G-664 Haven Hall
505 South State St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1045
(734) 763-3000
Fax (734) 936-3947
[email protected]

Mental Health Resources Portal

Clinics

Civil Rights Litigation Initiative: Students litigate civil rights cases addressing issues such as: racial justice, police misconduct, voting rights, fair housing, student rights, free speech, women's rights, LGBT rights, immigrant rights, ethnic and religious discrimination, disability rights, and the right to privacy. Taught by the former long-time legal director of the ACLU of Michigan, the goal of the course is to prepare students to use the law to advance social justice. Students will have the chance to litigate civil rights cases on behalf of individuals as well as larger impact cases.

Introduction to Law and Psychiatry at Civil, Criminal and Policy Crossroads (Seminar): In this course, students will become oriented to common crossroads where law and psychiatry intersect. The course will begin with an overview of mental illness, substance use disorders, and intellectual and developmental disabilities from legal and clinical perspectives. A review of case law and legislation pertaining to civil commitment, the right to treatment, the right to refuse treatment, and guardianship will help students gain an understanding of the legal regulation of psychiatric practice. Risk assessment, confidentiality and the duty to protect third parties and related tort claims will be covered. Students will explore mental health assessments and expert witness testimony pertaining to criminal law in areas such as competence to stand trial, competence to proceed pro se, criminal responsibility, and sex offenders. Finally, students will have an opportunity to learn about public systems attempt to address mental health treatment needs in psychiatric hospitals, jails and prisons and other venues such as treatment courts and other models have been developed to limit the redirect individuals with mental illness and substance use disorders from incarceration. The course will provide a forum to review federal legislation, government agencies, and litigation and how they come together to help shape services in public systems.

Courses

Employment Discrimination: This course will explore the full range of employment discrimination law issues, focusing initially on Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which prohibits employment discrimination based on "race, color, religion, sex, or national origin." The course will consider the basic legal framework for proving individual and class-based impact discrimination under Title VII, including how the courts utilize statistics in employment litigation. Affirmative action in employment, and the tension between equal treatment and equal results, will be studied. The course will address legal issues involving various forms of employment discrimination, including liability for workplace harassment, sex discrimination, equal pay, sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination, age discrimination and religious discrimination. Disability discrimination under the Americans with Disabilities Act and protection against retaliation for filing discrimination claims and opposition to discrimination in the workplace will also be considered. Remedial and procedural issues involving federal and state laws against discrimination will be a focus of the course throughout, including the role of the EEOC and the role of the private bar, arbitration and mediation of statutory claims, and the use of class and collective actions in enforcing federal and state employment discrimination laws.

Mental Health Law and Policy: In this course, students will become oriented to common crossroads where law and psychiatry intersect. The course will begin with an overview of mental illness, substance use disorders, and intellectual and developmental disabilities from legal and clinical perspectives. A review of case law and legislation pertaining to civil commitment, the right to treatment, the right to refuse treatment, and guardianship will help students gain an understanding of the legal regulation of psychiatric practice. Risk assessment, confidentiality and the duty to protect third parties and related tort claims will be covered. Students will explore mental health assessments and expert witness testimony pertaining to criminal law in areas such as competence to stand trial, competence to proceed pro se, criminal responsibility, and sex offenders. Finally, students will have an opportunity to learn about public systems attempt to address mental health treatment needs in psychiatric hospitals, jails and prisons and other venues such as treatment courts and other models have been developed to limit the redirect individuals with mental illness and substance use disorders from incarceration. The course will provide a forum to review federal legislation, government agencies, and litigation and how they come together to help shape services in public systems. 

Student Organizations

Disability Rights Organization

Wayne State University Law School (Detroit)

Contact/ Disability Resource Center

WSU Student Disability Services

Student Disability Services (SDS) serves as a resource for the Wayne State University community to ensure academic access and inclusion for students, supporting a view of disability guided by social, cultural and political forces. We work to create an inclusive academic environment by promoting universal design throughout the university. SDS provides academic accommodations, resources and training in assistive technology to foster self-advocacy and success for students with disabilities. We share information to foster understanding of disability throughout the university community.

5155 Gullen Mall
1600 Undergraduate Library
Detroit, Michigan 48202

Getting to campus | Finding SDS in the library

Phone: (313) 577-1851
Videophone: (313) 202-4216
Fax: (313) 577-4898
Email: [email protected]

Disability Accommodations Portal

Clinics

Disability Law Clinic: The Disability Law Clinic addresses the unique legal needs of Detroit-area residents with disabilities, helping them obtain the support, services, and accommodations they need to live independent and productive lives in the community. It provides free legal aid to people with disabilities in civil and administrative matters related to their disabilities (e.g. disability civil rights, special education, health insurance coverage, guardianship/conservatorship, Social Security Disability Insurance/SSI).

Courses

Disability Law: This course surveys American law as it relates to people with disabilities, with particular emphasis on the Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. The focus of the course is on access to employment, government programs and services, places of public accommodation, housing, healthcare, education, and insurance. Other topics addressed include civil commitment; guardianship, conservatorship, and less restrictive alternatives; and income support programs.