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February 21, 2020

Indiana

Indiana University Maurer School of Law - Bloomington

Contact/ Disability Resource Center

Accessible Educational Services

Accessible Educational Services (AES) is dedicated to ensuring that students with qualifying medical conditions, under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), have the tools, support services, and resources that allow equal access and reasonable accessibility measures (accommodations) to be successful at Indiana University Bloomington.

Accessible Educational Services
Eigenmann Hall #001
1900 E 10th St.
Bloomington, IN 47406

Phone: 812-855-7578
Fax: 812-855-7650
Email: [email protected]

Externships

Examples of employers with Disability Rights focus where Maurer students have externed before include: 

  • The Indiana Civil Rights Commission (ICRC) enforces the civil rights laws of the State of Indiana. We investigate complaints of discrimination and educate organizations, companies, landlords, associations, and individuals on their rights and responsibilities under Indiana Civil Rights Laws. 
  • Indiana Disability Rights is the service arm of the Indiana Protection and Advocacy Services (IPAS) Commission. The mission is to uphold, promote, and advance the rights of individuals with disabilities through empowerment and advocacy to achieve a more equitable society.

  • Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic is a 501(c)(3) organization that provides free legal services statewide to those who can't afford them, believing everyone deserves access to justice regardless of income.

  • The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is responsible for enforcing federal laws that make it illegal to discriminate against a job applicant or an employee because of the person's race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy and related conditions, gender identity, and sexual orientation), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information.

Courses

Law & Education: Legal Perspectives: This course prepares students to: 1) identify legal issues occurring in public PK-12 schools so that you can formulate, articulate, and defend alternative solutions; 2) describe and analyze key principles of school/district policy as well as federal and state law and apply them to real life scenarios; 3) increase awareness about the importance of legal literacy for administrators, educators, policymakers, and others; 4) access primary sources of law (i.e., federal and state statutes, regulations, and case law) needed to analyze and solve legal dilemmas and to stay abreast of evolving law; 5) collaborate with others to solve complex legal and ethical dilemmas; 6) communicate persuasively in oral and written form to advocate for themselves, colleagues, students, school, and district; and 7) analyze diversity, equity, inclusion, social justice, and ethical issues involving but not limited to: socio-economic status, race, ethnicity, national origin, language proficiency, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, and sex. This course qualifies as one of the School of Education courses that is required for the J.D. Minor in Education Policy.  

Law & Education: Legal Aspects of Higher Education:  The purpose of this course is to introduce current legal issues occurring in higher education settings. Specifically, this course will prepare you to: 1) identify legal issues occurring in public higher education settings so that you can formulate, articulate, and defend alternative solutions; 2) describe and analyze key principles of higher education/college policy as well as federal and state law and apply them to real life scenarios; 3) increase your awareness about the importance of legal literacy for administrators, faculty, policymakers, and others; 4) access primary sources of law (i.e., federal and state statutes, regulations, and case law) needed to analyze and solve legal dilemmas and to stay abreast of evolving law; 5) collaborate with others to solve complex legal issues; 6) communicate persuasively in oral and written form so that you can advocate for yourself, colleagues, students, school, and district; and 7) analyze a variety of social justice and ethical issues involving socio-economic status, race, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender. This course qualifies as one of the School of Education courses that is required for the J.D. Minor in Education Policy.

Employment Discrimination: This course examines federal civil rights laws prohibiting employment discrimination based on race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, and disability. The course considers litigation strategy and the sources, theories, and goals of anti-discrimination law. Specific subjects covered include discriminatory refusals to hire and terminations, workplace harassment and the MeToo movement, and employers responsibilities (or lack thereof) to accommodate or address pregnancy and family responsibilities, religious practices, and disabilities. The applicability of current law to discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity is also addressed.

Law & Education: Legal Perspectives: This course prepares students to: 1) identify legal issues occurring in public PK-12 schools so that you can formulate, articulate, and defend alternative solutions; 2) describe and analyze key principles of school/district policy as well as federal and state law and apply them to real life scenarios; 3) increase awareness about the importance of legal literacy for administrators, educators, policymakers, and others; 4) access primary sources of law (i.e., federal and state statutes, regulations, and case law) needed to analyze and solve legal dilemmas and to stay abreast of evolving law; 5) collaborate with others to solve complex legal and ethical dilemmas; 6) communicate persuasively in oral and written form to advocate for themselves, colleagues, students, school, and district; and 7) analyze diversity, equity, inclusion, social justice, and ethical issues involving but not limited to: socio-economic status, race, ethnicity, national origin, language proficiency, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, and sex.

Student Organizations

Maurer Disabled Law Students Association (Contact: [email protected])

Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law - Indianapolis

Contact/ Disability Resource Center

Adaptive Educational Services (AES)

Adaptive Educational Services (AES) is the disability services office for IUPUI, IUPUC, and IUFW students. This office determines if a student qualifies for accommodations, approves reasonable accommodations, and serves the campus community to ensure the implementation of those accommodations whenever possible. AES strives to ensure that students have equal opportunities to pursue a university education, while also maintaining a high level of academic integrity.

Joseph T. Taylor Hall (UC), Room 137
815 W. Michigan St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202
(317) 274-3241
Video phone (317) 278-2052
Fax (317) 278-2051
[email protected]

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR A DOCUMENTED DISABILITY: For more information about accommodations for a documented disability, please visit the website for IUPUI Adaptive Educational Services (AES) at http://diversity.iupui.edu/aes/. In addition to contacting AES, make the Senior Associate Director for Student Affairs aware of accommodation submission at 317-278-6167. If approved by AES, the paperwork required to receive accommodations will be forwarded to the Office of Student Affairs. Afterwards, the Senior Associate Director for Student Affairs will schedule a meeting with you to review the applicable accommodations policies and procedures. For more information on AES exam accommodations, please visit https://mckinneylaw.iu.edu/net/students/exampolicy.pdf

Clinics

The Disability Clinic operates in conjunction with Indiana Legal Services, Inc. in providing quality legal assistance to low-income individuals while also providing law student interns the opportunity to engage in actual case representation. The Disability Clinic, in particular, represents persons with long-term, disabling conditions in obtaining or maintaining government benefits before the Social Security Administration. The Civil Practice Clinic also represents clients with physical or mental disabilities, though that is not its primary focus.

Courses

Disability Law: Introduces students to the history and modern analytical approach to laws, regulations, and cases impacting people with disabilities. Topics include the historical treatment of people with disabilities (including institutionalization and eugenics), public and private accommodations, discrimination in housing and employment, special education, institutionalization, disability interaction with the justice system, health care, abuse, neglect and exploitation, guardianship, and public entitlements.

Discrimination in Employment: considers federal and state statutes and regulations relating to discrimination on the basis of race, sex, and other factors with respect to terms and conditions of employment by either employers or unions.

Other Information

The Health Law Society provides a forum in which students and faculty can become informed about medical and legal issues, including topics in disability law and disability rights. Activities of the Health Law Society include panel discussions and colloquia, sponsored in cooperation with the school's nationally-ranked Hall-Render Center for Law and Health. More information is available on the website at http://www.indylaw.indiana.edu/centers/clh/student/HLS/, or email: [email protected]

Notre Dame Law School (Notre Dame)

Contact/ Disability Resource Center

Center for Student Support and Care

Grounded in the University’s Catholic, Holy Cross tradition, the Center for Student Support and Care is dedicated to providing all Notre Dame students with collaborative, individualized care that promotes academic and personal well-being. Through accompaniment, coaching, resources, and a commitment to equal access, students are supported as they navigate both internal and external barriers, cultivate resilience, and journey towards their most authentic selves.

228 Coleman Morse
Notre Dame, IN 46556 USA
Phone: (574) 631-7833
[email protected][email protected]

Accessibility Portal (link)

Courses

Law and Disabilities: Emphasizes federal legislation and implementing regulations together with Supreme Court decisions interpreting those statutes and rules. Considers selected state authorities in connection with topics such as appropriate placement and treatment of institutionalized mentally disabled persons and appropriate public education of disabled students. Other topics include the Social Security disability system and issues pertaining to accessibility of public buildings and transportation services. A significant part of the course concerns the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Considers difficulties encountered in implementing the Rehabilitation Act, Supreme Court interpretations of that act, and the resulting effects on the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Employment Discrimination Law: Studies the substantive and procedural aspects of federal legislation dealing with employment discrimination, including Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Student Organizations

Best Buddies, [email protected] 
Logan Recreation Club, [email protected] (Club Advisor Marissa Runkle - [email protected])
National Alliance on Mental Illness-Notre Dame, [email protected]
Special Friends Club of Notre Dame, [email protected]