DR Roster List

Welcome to the first version of the Women in Dispute Resolution Committee’s (WIDR) Mediation and Arbitration Roster List, created by WIDR as a benefit for WIDR members as well as ABA Dispute Resolution Section Members.

One of WIDR's missions is to create opportunities for diverse neutrals, a significant number of whom may be relatively new to the field. Particularly if one is building an ADR practice, but even if one is well along, it is important to know where to look to find opportunities to gain and expand our arbitration and mediation experience.

The spreadsheet available here represents a first step towards a comprehensive list of potential opportunities to mediate or arbitrate, paid or unpaid, through panels, rosters, or as independents. In some cases we have also listed neutral associations. The list focuses primarily on U.S. domestic organizations, but we have included some international organizations as well. Although the headers on the list (name, state, type, website, etc.) are sortable via the usual Excel spread sheet functions (click on Data – Sort*), we hope eventually to create a searchable database from this information, perhaps even with Wikipedia-like group update capabilities.

Here are the caveats:

1. Because ADR in general has exploded over the past several years, we are confident that this list it is not complete. Particularly for community mediation, but for other types of opportunities as well, there are doubtless numerous organizations that we have missed. We are working to increase our listings of on-line dispute resolution organizations, for example. This document is good start and should provide ideas for further research by interested mediators and arbitrators for similar types of organizations locally, regionally and nationally. We need your help, however; if you know of or identify any additional organizations, please let us know by inputting any additional information Here

2. The list was built from the personal knowledge of WIDR members, the Dispute Resolution Leadership List Serv, and internet searches performed by two terrific ABA summer interns. We have not described the organizations beyond their name, types listed, location, website and in some cases their special focus, and not all of the organizations are known to any of us personally. Users of this list will need to go to the websites listed to determine contact information, eligibility criteria and whether or not the organization actually represents an opportunity for them. We have also in some cases listed Membership Organizations that do not maintain rosters but may provide opportunities for learning and networking, such as the Association of Conflict Resolution.

 

3. To give you some general ideas, here are some of the types of rosters represented:

 

(a) National and regional/local private rosters and panels such as the AAA, CPR,  JAMS, NADN, ARIAS and, as a local MA example, Mediation Works Inc. in the Boston  area. Some of these specialize in a particular area of law (ARIAS does insurance  cases, American Health Lawyers Association does healthcare and life sciences,  etc.)

 

 (b) Arbitration and mediation programs associated with state and federal courts  (again, paid or unpaid), both in general civil matters and in connection with special subjects (such as prisoners' rights, a program that exists in the Western District of PA, bankruptcy courts, etc.) We have not listed every court program. Anyone interested in building an ADR career carefully should research all local, state and federal court ADR programs in their area. See also a general information site listed on the spread sheet under State Court ADR programs.   

 

(c) Arbitration and mediation programs run by state and federal government agencies that in fact may have mandates to increase their use of ADR. The list contains a link to a comprehensive Federal Agency ADR guide, and calls out some of the federal programs individually (EEOC, etc.) Please see the guide for a more complete listing.

 

(d) We did not emphasize this, but we do list some international and global trade organizations and efforts associated with the United Nations and NGO's, such as the World Intellectual Property Organization  (WIPO), a self-funding agency of the United Nations, which maintains an  arbitration and mediation service for intellectual property matters. There is a row in the spread sheet entitled “International Opportunities” that lists some of the primary international provider websites (London, Singapore, etc.)

 

 (e) State and local bar associations (such as the MA Bar's Fee Arbitration Board, a panel of pro bono arbitrators who help resolve fee disputes between lawyers  and clients) As with all categories, all those interested in seeking opportunities should research the opportunities that general and specialized bars (real estate, etc.) offer locally, regionally or nationally.

 

(f)  Community Mediation agencies (often these groups provide services to courts  seeking to provide mediation opportunities to litigants in, for example, small  claims, housing and family courts.) We have provided a link to an interactive map of such opportunities available on the web through the National Association of Family and Community Mediation under “Community Mediation.”

 

(g) There are some private ADR networks  or firms on the list as well -- groups of neutrals who hold themselves out as a mediation firm or network run by a third party. Obviously these opportunities are not necessarily “open” to new folks, but we thought that the insight gained into different business models might be useful to DR Section members.  

* If you need help learning to sort data in excel, check out Microsoft’s help site: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/excel-help/sort-data-in-a-range-or-table-HP010073947.aspx

 

4. We have not listed in any systematic way opportunities to serve as a hearing officer or ombudsman. (The Public Housing Authority in Chicago, IL and the American Health Lawyers Association both maintain rosters of hearing officers.) HO and ombudsman roles provide additional avenues for conflict resolution professionals.

 

We hope that you find the spreadsheet useful, and please do not forget to help us improve it!

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