February 27, 2020 PROGRAMMING

The Erosion of Disparate Impact and Future of Civil Rights in Education

Part 2 of the Education and Democracy Webinar Series

Program Description:  The series continues with an exploration of disparate impact legal theory and its significance for protecting civil rights in education and addressing discrimination in a variety of areas, including school discipline disparities. Speakers also explored the history and significance of disparate impact as a leading legal theory and how recent attempts to erode it can impact students' civil rights and access to educational opportunities. 

  • Andrew Hairston, Director, School-to-Prison Pipeline Project, Texas Appleseed
  • Liz King, Program Director, Education, Leadership Conference on Civil & Human Rights
  • David Hinojosa, Director, Education Opportunities Project, Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law
  • Veronique Pluviose, Staff Director for Chairman Bobby Scott, Education and Labor Committee, U.S. House of Representatives
  • Janel A. George (Moderator), Co-Chair, Civil Rights and Equal Opportunity Committee, Section of Civil Rights and Social Justice, American Bar Association & Co-Chair, Education Committee, Section of Civil Rights and Social Justice, American Bar Association

Additional Materials

We Came to Learn: A Call to Action for Police Free Schools
Courtesy of Andrew Hairston

Civil Rights Principles for Safe, Healthy, and Inclusive School Climates
Courtesy of Andrew Hairston

K-12 Education:  Discipline Disparities for Black Students, Boys, and Students with Disabilities 
Courtesy of Veronique Pluviose

Brown v. Board of Education at 65: A Promise Unfulfilled, Hearing Before the  H. Comm. on Educ. & Lab., 116th Cong. 
Courtesy of Veronique Pluviose

Civil Rights Principles for Safe, Healthy, and Inclusive School Climates
Courtesy of Liz King

David Hinojosa's Presentation (PDF)

About the Webinar Series


Developed by the leadership of the Section's Education Committee,  this series—Education and Democracy—will explore the significance of access to quality education as a prerequisite for meaningful participation in American democracy. Building upon the U.S. Supreme Court's observation in the case of Brown v. Board of Education that "education is the very foundation of good citizenship," this series examines how education shapes democratic participation in a variety of significant ways.

Co-Sponsored by:

Division for Public Education
Standing Committee on Election Law
Center for Public Interest Law
Center on Children and the Law
Section of State and Local Government Law
The Section's African American Affairs Committee

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