January 15, 2020 PROGRAMMING

Education & Democracy

A Four-Part Webinar Series

About the Webinar Series

This series—Education and Democracy—explored the significance of access to quality education as a prerequisite for meaningful participation in American democracy. Building upon the U.S. Supreme Court's observation in the case of Brown v. Board of Education that "education is the very foundation of good citizenship," this series examined how education shapes democratic participation in a variety of significant ways.

Education and Democracy: Exploring the significance of access to education as a prerequisite for meaningful participation in American democracy.

Education and Democracy: Exploring the significance of access to education as a prerequisite for meaningful participation in American democracy.

Co-Sponsors: Division for Public EducationStanding Committee on Election LawCenter for Public Interest LawCenter on Children and the LawSection of State and Local Government Law, The Section's African American Affairs Committee

The Educated Citizen—Education as Preparation for Civic Participation

Date: Thursday, January 30, 2020

Panelists

  • Peter W. Cookson, Jr., Senior Researcher, Learning Policy Institute; Managing Director of the think tank Education Sector and Founder of the Equity Project at the American Institutes for Research
  • Lisa Holder, Of Counsel, Equal Justice Society
  • Michael A. Rebell, Executive Director, Campaign for Educational Equity at Teachers College, Columbia University, suit for right to civic education 
  • Kimberly Robinson, Elizabeth D. and Richard A. Merrill Professor of Law, University of Virginia School of Law and Professor of Education and Curry School of Education and Human Development, University of Virginia

Moderator

  • Janel George, Co-Chair, Civil Rights and Equal Opportunity Committee, Section of Civil Rights and Social Justice, American Bar Association & Co-Chair, Education Committee, Section of Civil Rights and Social Justice, American Bar Association

Program Description: The series launches with this foundational program that will explore how quality education helps prepare informed and engaged citizens. Speakers will address the importance of quality education that includes civics and how denial of such an education hinders participation in democratic institutions, like voting.

 

The Erosion of Disparate Impact and Future of Civil Rights in Education

Date: Thursday, February 27, 2020

Panelists

  • Andrew Hairston, Director, School-to-Prison Pipeline Project, Texas Appleseed
  • Liz King, Program Director, Education, Leadership Conference on Civil & Human Rights
  • David Hinojosa, Director, Education Opportunities Project, Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law
  • Veronique Pluviose, Staff Director for Chairman Bobby Scott, Education and Labor Committee, U.S. House of Representatives

Moderator

  • Janel George, Co-Chair, Civil Rights and Equal Opportunity Committee, Section of Civil Rights and Social Justice, American Bar Association & Co-Chair, Education Committee, Section of Civil Rights and Social Justice, American Bar Association

Program Description: The next program will explore the disparate impact legal theory and its significance for protecting civil rights in education and addressing discrimination in a variety of areas, including school discipline disparities. Speakers will explore the history and significance of disparate impact as a leading legal theory and how recent attempts to erode it can impact students' civil rights and access to educational opportunities. 

Democratization of Resources—Resource Inequities and Educational Opportunities

Date: Thursday, March 26, 2020

Panelists

  • Robert Kim, Education Law & Policy Writer/Consultant
  • David Sciarra, Executive Director, Education Law Center
  • Ajmel Quereshi, Senior Counsel, Legal Defense Fund

Moderator

  • Janel George, Co-Chair, Civil Rights and Equal Opportunity Committee, Section of Civil Rights and Social Justice, American Bar Association & Co-Chair, Education Committee, Section of Civil Rights and Social Justice, American Bar Association

Program Description: The COVID-19 pandemic has further exposed school resource disparities that disproportionately impact students of color and students from low-income families. This program will examine how resource inequities compromise educational opportunities and outcomes for students of color and students from low-income families. Leading civil rights litigators will discuss historic and current efforts to expand access to quality educational opportunities to all students.

The Price Paid for Brown: Desegregation and the Expulsion of Black Teachers — Implications Then & Now

Date: Thursday, April 30, 2020

Panelists

  • Tanya Clay House, JD, Senior Program Officer for Voting Rights, State Infrastructure Fund, NEO Philanthropy; Former Deputy U.S. Assistant Secretary for P-12 Education, U.S. Department of Education
  • Leslie T. Fenwick, PhD, Dean Emeritus & Professor, Howard University School of Education; Dean in Residence, American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE)
  • Congressman Bobby Scott, Chairman of the Committee on Education and Labor; U.S. Representative for Virginia's 3rd Congressional District
  • Dr. Reg Weaver, Former President, National Education Association (NEA); Vice President, Education International (EI)

Moderator

  • Cynthia Swann, Co-Chair, African American Affairs Committee, Section of Civil Rights and Social Justice, American Bar Association; Council Member, Section of Civil Rights and Social Justice, American Bar Association; Co-Chair, Education Committee, Section of Civil Rights and Social Justice, American Bar Association

Program Description: The historic role of black educators in school desegregation efforts, the retaliation they faced as a result, and the ongoing implications as a consequence of Brown v. Board. This segment will also explore how the coronavirus—COVID-19—has further exposed the failures of public policy to bridge the cultural, technical, and economic divide in public education.

The Price Paid for Brown: Desegregation and the Expulsion of Black Teachers — Implications Then & Now
The Price Paid for Brown: Desegregation and the Expulsion of Black Teachers — Implications Then & Now
The historic role of black educators in school desegregation efforts, the retaliation they faced as a result, and the ongoing implications as a consequence of Brown v. Board. This segment will also explore how the coronavirus—COVID-19—has further exposed the failures of public policy to bridge the cultural, technical, and economic divide in public education.