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Lewis & Clark Law School

Lewis & Clark Law School
10015 SW Terwilliger Blvd
Portland, OR 97219
law.lclark.edu/

Law School Pro Bono Programs

Contact Information

Tracy Sullivan
Executive Director of Public Interest Law Program
E-mail
P: (503) 768-6886

Category Type

Formal Voluntary Pro Bono Program Characterized by a Referral System with a Coordinator

Description of Programs

The Pro Bono Program, created in 1997, offers students opportunities to serve as volunteer legal interns with public service organizations. Pro bono opportunities are advertised through online and paper postings, through a pro bono and public interest email list, through individual student meetings, and through annual pro bono panels (bringing organizations on campus to meet students).

Pro bono opportunities range from work with legal service providers and issue advocacy groups to work with private attorneys assisting pro bono clients. Students also volunteer with a variety of groups doing non-law community service work. For students seeking a Certificate in Public Interest Law, 50 hours of pro bono work are required.

During the 2014-2015 school year, students reported more than 15,500 hours of pro bono and community service combined.

Location of Programs

Career & Professional Development Center

Staffing/Management/Oversight

The Pro Bono and Community Service Programs are coordinated by the Executive Director of Public Interest Law, who is a full-time employee of the law school, in partnership with the Public Interest Law Program.

Funding

The Pro Bono Program is funded through a dedicated Public Interest Budget.

The school provides resources and space to a number of related programs and centers that host student volunteers

Student Run Pro Bono Groups/Specialized Law Education Projects

American Civil Liberties Union: The student ACLU group works on pro bono matters with ACLU of Oregon, and coordinates the annual ACLU Northwest Civil Liberties Conference, speakers, and presentations.

Asian/Pacific American Law Student Association: APALSA provides its members with personal, academic, and professional support to aid in the development of its law students. We work with attorneys in the Portland area to provide networking and professional development opportunities for APALSA members. We also hold several events throughout the school year to build a sense of community within APALSA and the rest of the student body.

Black Law Student Association: The Black Law Student Association is a student run club that includes members from diverse backgrounds; BLSA is dynamic and is dedicated to increasing diversity and communication amongst students and legal professionals. Our organization was formed in order to articulate and promote the needs of black law students, while effecting positive change in the legal community. By encouraging students to pursue careers in the judiciary, we hope to adopt and implement policies that will foster economic independence.

Coalition Advocating for Transportation Solutions (CATS): CATS works to build a future where transportation-related greenhouse gases are at a minimum, and where riding bikes, taking busses, and carpooling are more common than driving single occupancy vehicles. We work to increase bike awareness, safety and advocacy on campus and beyond. We work with the administration, students and the community to increase environmentally sensible and sustainable modes of travel for the L&C Law School family.

Crime Victims' Rights Alliance: The Crime Victims' Rights Alliance is dedicated to raising awareness and educating future lawyers about the issues related to crime victims advocacy. We aim to facilitate discussions about how to acknowledge and further the rights of crime victims. We hold many events throughout the school year on topics ranging from a victim's right to privacy to the psychological traumas faced by victims of crimes.

Criminal Law Society: The Criminal Law Society at Lewis and Clark is a student group that strives to promote criminal law dialogue, practice, policy, and scholarship. While our members' backgrounds and career goals vary widely from both sides of the criminal law perspective, we're all interested in criminal law and committed to increasing the presence of criminal law at our school. With the goal of networking and contributing to the criminal law community in Portland and the surrounding areas, we invite speakers, hold panels, and hold other networking events. Furthermore, we arrange field trips to prisons, trials, and judges' chambers.

Employment Law Society: The Employment Law Society (ELS) is dedicated to promoting student opportunities in employment law through informational programs, volunteer service events, and lively discussion of the latest employment law issues.

Environmental Justice Advocates (EJA): Environmental justice ("EJ"), occurs at the intersection between social and racial justice and environmentalism. EJA's focus over the upcoming school year is to empower and aid under served communities and communities of color self-determine their own environmental values, particularly with regard to equitable distribution of environmental burdens and benefits, human health, and public welfare. Environmental Justice is the idea that the income, race, or ethnicity of communities should not correlate to their quality of living environment. The Environmental justice Advocates advocate for and support, through direct action and the law, communities' efforts toward environmental justice.

Environmental Law Caucus: The Environmental Law Caucus (ELC is dedicated to educating the Lewis & Clark Law School community about environmental issues and fostering environmental stewardship, whether on or off campus. ELC plans several events, which include hiking, ivy pulls in Tryon Creek, the "Bike to Eugene Challenge," and the fall Mushroom Hunt. We also provide transportation and lodging for the Public Interest Environmental Law Conference. So get your head out of the books and come join the fun with ELC!

International Justice Mission: International Justice Mission is a human rights agency that brings rescue to victims of slavery, sexual exploitation and other forms of violent oppression. IJM seeks to restore to victims of oppression the things that God intends for them: their lives, their liberty, their dignity, and the fruits of their love and labor. By defending and protecting individual human rights, IJM seeks to bring hope and transformation for those it serves and restore a witness of courage in places of oppressive violence. The Lewis & Clark Law School IJM Campus Chapter is made up of students passionate about integrating the work of justice into their faith. We focus our activities around three main objectives: raising awareness on our campus and in our community about the reality of modern-day slavery, raise our voice on behalf of victims of injustice through advocacy and prayer and finally, raise funds to enable IJM to bring rescue to victims of modern-day slavery.

International Law Society (ILS): The International Law Society (ILS) at Lewis and Clark is a chapter of the International Law Students Association. The ILS follows the goal of the parent organization in seeking to promote international law; to encourage communication and cooperation among students and lawyers internationally; to contribute to legal education; to promote social responsibility in the field of law; to increase opportunities for students to learn about other cultures and legal systems worldwide; and to publicizing educational and career opportunities in international law.

J. Reuben Clark Law Society: We affirm the strength brought to the study of law by a law student's personal religious conviction. We strive through public service and diligence in our studies to promote fairness and virtue founded upon the rule of law. Our core values include public service, loyalty to the rule of law, and appreciation for the religious dimension and in a law student's personal lie.

Jewish Legal Society: Our mission is to provide a forum for Jewish law students to interact with one another and with the greater community of Portland. In addition to organizing the annual Passover Seder for students, staff, and faculty, JLS also hosts Jewish speakers on campus, organizes Jewish student-attorney networking opportunities, and leads community service events and activities throughout the academic year.

Latino Law Society: The Latino Law Society is an organization comprised of Latino students and students who support the organization's goals. The organization promotes: the recruitment and retention of Latino students; unity among the Latino students; and awareness and understanding in the law school and the community of perspectives, culture, heritage and issues concerning Latinos. Additionally, LLS provides a support system for its members . We are an equal opportunity organization, you do not need to be Latino to join just have an interest in Latino issues, culture and heritage.

Law Students for Reproductive Justice: Law Students for Reproductive Justice trains and mobilizes law students and new lawyers across the country to foster legal expertise and support for the realization of reproductive justice. Reproductive justice will exist when all people can exercise the rights and access the resources they need to thrive and to decide whether, when, and how to have and parent children with dignity, free from discrimination, coercion, or violence. LSRJ works to advance understanding of reproductive justice through active communities on law school campuses to foster diverse membership and encourage multi-issue activism an build a foundation of lasting support for reproductive justice within the legal community.

Minority Law Student Association: The Minority Law Student Association of Lewis & Clark Law School serves to promote the recruitment and retention of minority students, staff and faculty, to promote unity among students of color, to promote awareness and understanding in the law school and the community of perspectives, culture, and heritage of students of color, and to create a forum to address issues concerning its members.

National Lawyers Guild: The National Lawyers Guild is national non-profit legal and political organization of lawyers, legal workers, law students and jailhouse lawyers. We represent progressive political movements, using the law to protect human rights above property interests and to attain social justice. If you want to organize against the death penalty, go out into the community to inform people of their rights by being a "Know Your Rights" trainer, be a presence in Portland activist community through legal observing, or just meet with progressive lawyers, we can make it happen.

Native American Law Student Association (NALSA): The Native American Law Students Association (NALSA) would like to invite you to our next activity. NALSA is open to all members of the Lewis & Clark Community and looks forward to your participation! NALSA's goals are to educate the Lewis & Clark Community about legal issues affecting Native American and Alaskan Native communities, promote the study of Federal Indian law, and encourage interaction with local tribes.

Northwest Environmental Defense Center: NEDC is an independent non-profit organization located on the Lewis & Clark Law School campus. NEDC students work as members of one or more project groups, including: Lands and Wildlife, Water, and Air. The groups are coordinated by student Project Group Coordinators who are responsible for evaluating notices of proposed agency actions and requests for assistance from other environmental groups to determine whether NEDC should be involved in a given project.

OUTLAW: OUTLAW provides a forum for gays, lesbians, bisexuals, transgendered, questioning students and their allies to meet, exchange ideas, share experiences, and bring pertinent legal and political issues of the LGBT community to campus. We are committed to creating a community for diverse voices through political activism and social interaction, and welcome all students to join us.

Public Interest Law Program: PILP's mission is to contribute to the public interest by financially supporting students and graduates who choose fulfilling careers working for the public good. Throughout the academic year the board and many hard-working volunteers hold fundraising events, culminating in the annual Auction. Annual events include Karaoke with professors and a Poker Tournament. The Auction takes place in March and preparation goes on all year. These fundraising efforts allow PILP to fund 10-15 students every summer to work in public interest. Summer stipend recipients have worked for a variety of organizations, dealing with issues such as children's rights, environmental protection, domestic violence, and civil rights.

Student Animal Legal Defense Fund (SALDF): The Student Animal Legal Defense Fund (SALDF) is a student group that strives to enhance the welfare and legal status of all nonhuman animals through education and advocacy. We provide opportunities for animal law pro bono work, community service, and activism, and we hold many informative and celebratory events throughout the year that promote critical thinking about animals' various relationship to humans—companion animals, food, research subjects, entertainers, elements of biodiversity, etc.—and exploration of our legal duties to the animals in those relationships.

Students for International Environmental Law (SIEL): The mission of Students for International Environmental Law (SIEL) at Lewis & Clark Law School is to promote education and collaboration on issues of international environmental law within the community at the local, national, and global levels. SIEL will accomplish these goals by: sharing developments and promoting discussion; coordinating projects both internally and with other groups; hosting international law focused events; facilitating networking opportunities; and sharing information on careers in the international environmental law field.

Women's Law Caucus: The purpose of the Women's Law Caucus is to bring together the community of Lewis and Clark Law students interested in exploring the wide spectrum of legal issues affecting women. The WLC promotes women in the law by providing support and encouragement to students, enhancing ties with the community, and empowering future female leaders who will work toward the advancement of women's legal rights. All who are interested in advancing women's legal rights and empowering females are welcome to join, regardless of gender.

Faculty and Administrative Pro Bono

Faculty and staff participate in a various pro bono and community service activities. As an example, Lewis & Clark's Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA) is coordinated by faculty and offers students the opportunity to assist foreign tax filers.

Awards/Recognition

The Pro Bono Honors Program recognizes students who contribute 30 or more hours of law-related volunteer work during the school year. Students are provided with an award certificate at the annual Pro Bono & Community Service Honors Lunch, a notation on their transcripts, and recognition in the graduation program.

Lewis & Clark Law School offers a Public Interest Law Certificate for students who complete academic, pro bono, and paper requirements.

Each year, a Lewis & Clark Law student is honored by the Oregon State Bar in recognition of the most hours of pro bono service to the Oregon legal community.

Community Service

The Community Service Program, created in 2001, offers students the opportunity to volunteer with community organizations in a non-law related capacity. Volunteer opportunities are advertised through a pro bono and public interest email list, through individual student meetings, and through annual panels (bringing organizations on campus to meet students).

The requirements of the Community Service Honors Program are identical to the Pro Bono Honors Program, except there is no requirement that the work completed be legal in nature. Students who contribute 30 or more hours of community service work in a year are recognized with a certificate at the annual Pro Bono & Community Service Honors Lunch, a notation on their transcripts, and recognition in the graduation program.

Students also assist with Lewis & Clark's two diversity pipeline programs:

  • Summer Law Camp, providing a week-long education in the legal system targeting middle school students who are likely to be the first in their families to attend college.
  • Diversity Pipeline Mock Trial Day, giving middle and high school students from economically disadvantaged communities a chance to participate in a mock trial.

Law School Public Interest Programs

Contact Information

Tracy Sullivan
Executive Director of Public Interest Law Program
E-mail
P: (503) 768-6886

Certificate/Curriculum Programs

Certificate in Public Interest Law The Certificate in Public Interest Law allows students with a passion for serving the public to focus their studies and gain the skills they need to pursue a public interest career. To receive the certificate, students must complete a selection of public interest courses, write a comprehensive research paper on a subject relating to public interest law, and complete 50 hours of student pro bono service. Students have the option to further focus their studies into a specific subject area and receive recognition of that focus on their certificate. Focus areas include: Health, Disability, & Aging, Labor & Employment, Consumer Law, International Law & Immigration, Family & Juvenile Law, Civil Rights, and Indian Law.

Other Certificates: in addition to the dedicated Public Interest Certificate, Lewis & Clark offers students a chance to focus on the following areas related to Public Interest Law:

Animal Law Certificate

Criminal Law and Procedure Certificate

Environmental and Natural Resources Certificate

International Law Certificate

LL.M. in Environmental and Natural Resources Law

LL.M. in Animal Law

Public Interest Centers

Center for Animal Law Studies: The Center for Animal Law Studies is an academic and scholarly Animal Law program dedicated to: 1) Training future leaders for careers in Animal Law and public policy; 2) Conducting high-quality, independent legal research that advances the field of Animal Law; 3) Developing innovative recommendations and legal strategies relating to Animal Law within administrative, legislative, litigation and other settings; 4) Creating a scholarly environment where students, regardless of particular point of view, feel included and respected; and 5) Ensuring that the interests of animals are always considered as the field develops. The Center is the only legal and academic think tank and training program in the world for students interested in Animal Law. Students are provided with paid and volunteer opportunities through the Center.

National Crime Victim Law Institute: NCVLI seeks to promote a society in which: 1) Every crime victim has comprehensive and meaningful legal rights and can access a knowledgeable attorney for representation in the criminal justice system; 2) Every crime victim's attorney has access to education, training, and technical support from a community of experts; 3) Everyone in the criminal justice system is knowledgeable about and respects the legal rights of crime victims; 4) Every crime victims' rights are routinely enforced to facilitate meaningful participation in the criminal justice system; and 5) Every right of every crime victim is honored in every case. NCVLI offers a clinic and both volunteer and externship opportunities for students.

Northwest Environmental Defense Center: NEDC was established by a group of professors, law students, and attorney alumni at Lewis & Clark Law School in 1969. NEDC is an independent, non-profit organization working to protect the environment and natural resources of the Pacific Northwest. NEDC provides legal support to individuals and grassroots organizations with environmental concerns, and engages in litigation independently or in conjunction with other environmental groups. NEDC also provides valuable hands-on experience for students seeking to enhance their education in environmental law through pro bono work and a paid student clerk position.

Oregon Justice Resource Center: The OJRC assists with trial and appellate litigation on behalf of indigent, prisoner, and low-income clients in federal and state courts on a range of civil liberties and civil rights matters, including but not limited to the death penalty, immigrant rights, and unfair procedural barriers to the courts. OJRC staff work to facilitate meaningful opportunities for students in the areas of criminal justice and immigration. Current work focuses on indigent defense, capital defense, assisting refugees and low-income immigrants, and police accountability. Students work with OJRC as volunteers or externs for credit.

Public Interest Clinics

Animal Law Clinic: The clinic focuses on matters of national and international importance, in addition to maintaining connections and working in the local community. Students conduct research, represent clients, work on clinic projects, and with attorneys outside the clinic to develop the field of animal law and encourage consideration of the interests of animals in legal decision making. Work includes research, transactional work, litigation, and strategic planning. Where possible students also shadow local lawyers, work with lawyer partners around the country, observe legal proceedings, and conduct field work to better understand the problems facing animals.

Crime Victim Litigation Clinic: In collaboration with the National Crime Victim Law Institute (NCVLI), the clinic focuses on the assertion and enforcement of victims' rights within the criminal justice system. Students provide practicing attorneys and victim advocates information, research, and legal analysis on victim law. Those projects require the students to apply legal research, writing, and analysis to live legal issues.

Criminal Justice Reform Clinic: The Criminal Justice Reform Clinic (CJRC) operates within the Oregon Justice Resource Center. CJRC students will have an opportunity to learn about and work on cases/issues related to innocence through the Oregon Innocence Project, advancing criminal justice reform (including appellate advocacy) through the Criminal Justice Project or post incarceration prisoner reentry through the Reentry Law Project. Students involved in the Clinic will have the opportunity to conduct investigations; conduct legal/fact research and analysis; write motions, briefs and reports for filing in state trial and appellate courts; interview and advise clients; attend legal and legislative meetings and hearings; and meet and participate in strategy sessions with members of the bar, the judiciary and community leaders. Students will also benefit from guest lectures by experienced attorneys, former clients, and allied professionals (e.g., psychologists, legislators, law enforcement, activists).

Earthrise: Environmental Clinic: The clinic represents a broad spectrum of environmental organizations seeking to prevent or reduce pollution and protect wildlife, habitat, and ecosystems. Students work on actual environmental cases and administrative issues under the supervision of the clinical professors.

International Environmental Law Project: The clinic focuses on developing, implementing, and enforcing international environmental law to tackle some of today's most challenging global issues. Students prepare documents and materials for meetings of the parties to international conventions and organizations, such as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), the International Whaling Commission, and NAFTA's environmental commission. Students may also prepare submissions to international tribunals to enforce international environmental law or draft new environmental treaties. Documents may be prepared on behalf of environmental organizations, governments, or international institutions.

Small Business Legal Clinic: The clinic provides business transactional legal advice to new and emerging businesses, primarily those owned by women, minorities, and recent immigrants. Students interview and counsel small business clients, draft and negotiate contracts and leases, and advocate for clients in regulatory and other civil matters.

Externships/Internships

Lewis & Clark Law School offers flexibility in the number of credits/hours students may undertake for an Externship experience. Students must select from the following options when enrolling for semester and summer placements. If approved by the placement andlegally permitted, a student may work more than the designated hours for the option selected, but the additional hours will not receive academic credit; students choosing this option must inform the Externship Program Administrator in writing and complete special time-keeping requirements.

Model 1: a minimum of 104 total hours = 3 credits (2 for placement, 1 for class component) (during the academic semester, the hours will ideally be done 8 hours/week for 13 weeks)

Model 2: a minimum of 156 total hours = 4 credits (3 for placement, 1 for class component) (during the academic semester, the hours will ideally be done 12 hours/week for 13 weeks)

Model 3: a minimum of 208 total hours = 5 credits (4 for placement, 1 for class component) (during the academic semester, the hours will ideally be done 16 hours/week for 13 weeks)

Model 4: a minimum of 260 total hours = 6 credits (5 for placement, 1 for class component) (during the academic semester, the hours will ideally be done 20 hours/week for 13 weeks)

Model 5: a minimum of 312 total hours = 7 credits (6 for placement, 1 for class component) (during the academic semester, the hours will ideally be done 24 hours/week for 13 weeks)

Model 6: a minimum of 364 total hours = 8 credits (7 for placement, 1 for class component) (during the academic semester, the hours will ideally be done 28 hours/week for 13 weeks)

Model 7: a minimum of 416 total hours = 9 credits (8 for placement, 1 for class component) (during the academic semester, the hours will ideally be done 32 hours/week for 13 weeks)

Model 8: a minimum of 468 total hours = 10 credits (9 for placement, 1 for class component) (during the academic semester, the hours will ideally be done 36 hours/week for 13 weeks)

Model 9: a minimum of 520 total hours = 11 credits (10 for placement, 1 for class component) (during the academic semester, the hours will ideally be done 40 hours/week for 13 weeks)

Model 10: a minimum of 560 total hours = 12 credits (11 for placement, 1 for class component) (during the academic semester, the hours will ideally be done 40 hours/week for 14 weeks)

All models require the class component and can be combined with an individual research paper (2 credits). The class component and individual research papers are described below.

Students undertaking summer externships are allowed to fulfill the total number of required hours over a period of less than 13 weeks. For example, a student approved to undertake a Model 5 (7 credit) Externship may work 39 hours/week for 8 weeks to satisfy the placement component of the Externship.

Classes with a Public Service Component

Lewis & Clark typically offers more than 40 classes focusing on subjects relating to public interest law.

One of the classes offered annually is Street Law Seminar taught in partnership with the Classroom Law Project. Lewis & Clark's offering of Street Law as a class rather than an extra curricular activity reflects our commitment to and recognition of the importance of providing good training to students providing know-your-right information to the community

Public Interest Journals

Journals:

Animal Law Review Animal Law was the first journal dedicated to animal law issues and today is the leading journal in this rapidly growing field. The objective is to provide a balanced scholarly forum to discuss all aspects of animal law. Animal Law is published bi-annually. Each volume includes two issues: a fall/winter issue and a spring/summer issue.

Environmental Law Established in 1969, Environmental Law is the nation's oldest law review dedicated solely to environmental issues. Environmental Law publishes four issues each year on a quarterly calendar. Topics of discussion run the gamut from in-depth analyses of recent cases to more abstract discussions of the latest pollution prevention theories.

Lewis & Clark Law Review Lewis & Clark Law Review is a general-purpose law review publishing original scholarship from across the legal academy. Select issues focus in part or in full on public interest topics

Web Sites:

Career & Professional Development Center

Certificate Programs

Clinical Programs

Courses/Curriculum

Externships/Field Placements

Institutes and Centers

Journals and Publications

LRAP

Northwest Public Service Career Fair

Pro Bono & Community Service Program

Public Interest Law

Scholarships

Summer Stipends

Student Groups

PI Career Support Center

Individual public interest job search counseling for students and alumni
Public interest resources and career planning materials
Public interest job postings
Public interest programming
Public interest publications created by the Career & Professional Development Center
Pro Bono & Public Interest Listserv
Northwest Consortium Public Service Career Fair
Pro Bono & Community Service Fair

Loan Repayment Assistance Programs (LRAP)

Graduates may receive LRAP assistance for up to five years after graduation. Assistance is granted to JD graduates within an income cap who substantially utilize their law degrees to serve under-represented people or causes while working in a public interest position. Lewis & Clark's LRAP strives to meet the annual loan servicing need of qualified graduates as determined by Income-based Repayment or Pay as You Earn.

Post-Graduate Fellowships/Awards

Law School Funded:

For the class of 2013, Lewis & Clark worked with a number of non-profit organizations to provide paid full-time one-year fellowship positions.

Graduate Student Funded:

None listed

Other Funding Sources:

Lewis & Clark is an Equal Justice Works member law school, making their fellowships available to our student and graduates. Students and graduates also have access to the fellowship resources of PSJD.org

Term Time Fellowships/Scholarships

Law School Funded:

Scholarships: Lewis & Clark offers a variety of scholarships for upper-division students,many with a connection to a specific subject related to public interest law or for a general commitment to society and public sector work.

Graduate Student Funded:

None listed

Other Funding Sources:

Federal Work Study Funds

Summer Fellowships

Law School Funded:

Public Interest Law Project (PILP) Summer Stipends: PILP stipends help students cover the costs of working at public interest and tribal organizations and government offices on behalf of underrepresented people and causes. Student fundraising provides the vast majority of the dollars for this program for more than 20 years. Awards are between $3,500 and $5,000 for full-time summer work.

Graduate Student Funded:

Yes

Other Funding Sources:

Lewis & Clark is an Equal Justice Works member law school making their Summer Corps program available to our students.

Extracurricular and Co-Curricular Programs

Public Interest Speakers through the Career & Professional Development Center and student groups.

Pro Bono & Community Service Fair
Northwest Public Service Career Fair
Animal Law Conference
Northwest Civil Liberties Conference
Crime Victim Law Conference

Student Public Interest Groups

Public Interest Law Project (PILP): PILP's mission is to contribute to the public interest by financially supporting students and graduates who choose careers working for the public good. Throughout the academic year, PILP holds fundraising events, culminating in an annual auction. PILP funds 10-20 students every summer to work in public interest positions. Summer stipend recipients have worked for a variety of organizations, dealing with issues such as children's rights, environmental protection, domestic violence, and civil rights.


American Civil Liberties Union: The purpose of Lewis & Clark Law School ACLU is to promote the cause of civil liberties among the students, faculty and staff at Lewis & Clark Law School.

American Constitution Society: The goal of ACS is to strengthen the intellectual foundations of a more progressive vision of the law. ACS provides forums for discussion and debate within the L&C Law School Community on issues such as: privacy, freedom of speech, federalism, antidiscrimination and affirmative action, gay rights, reproductive choice, disability rights, labor and consumer rights, and protection of health, safety, and the environment.

Asian/Pacific American Law Student Association: APALSA works to articulate and promote the needs and goals of Asian American students in Lewis & Clark Law School; to foster and encourage an attitude of professional excellence; to highlight the relationship of Asian American Law Students to their respective communities and to the legal system.

Black Law Student Association: The Black Law Student Association is a student run club that includes members from diverse backgrounds. BLSA is dynamic and is dedicated to increasing diversity and communication among students and legal professionals.

Coalition Advocating Transportation Solutions: The mission of CATS is to raise awareness and use of sensible, alternative, and sustainable modes of transportation.

Crime Victims' Rights Alliance: The Crime Victims' Rights Alliance (CVRA) works to raise awareness and educate future attorneys about crime victim advocacy by exploring current dilemmas in the field, offering solutions, promoting discussion, and encouraging collaboration among legal groups in acknowledging and furthering the rights of crime victims.

Criminal Law Society: The Criminal Law Society promotes awareness and understanding of the criminal justice system, both by the lawyers that work within the system and the society that is affected by its outcomes.

Employment Law Society: The Employment Law Society (ELS) is dedicated to promoting student opportunities in employment law through informational programs, volunteer events, and lively discussion of the latest employment law issues.

Environmental Justice Advocates: The Environmental Justice Advocates' mission is to advocate for and support, through direct action and the law, communities' efforts toward environmental justice.

Environmental Law Caucus: ELC provides a forum for law students to connect with the natural beauty of the Pacific Northwest and embrace environmentalism on a personal level.

Family Law Society: The Family Law Society's mission is to raise awareness of the family law field and opportunities therein for the student body, to establish and maintain relationships with family law attorneys, and to enrich the role of family law practice in the community.

Federalist Society: The Federalist Society seeks to redefine the terms of legal debate by providing a forum for legal experts of opposing views to interact with members of the legal profession, the judiciary, law students, academics, and the architects of public policy.

Health Law Group: The Health Law Group advances the health law curriculum, sponsors campus events, and engages in community outreach to promote health equity.

International Law Society: ILS seeks to promote international law; to encourage communication and cooperation among students and lawyers internationally; to contribute to legal education; to promote social responsibility in the field of law; to increase opportunities for students to learn about other cultures and legal systems worldwide; and to publicize educational and career opportunities in international law.

J. Reuben Clark Law Society: J. Ruben Clark Law Society strives to promote the values of (1) public service,?(2) loyalty to the rule of law, and?(3) appreciation for the religious dimension in society and in a law student's personal life.

Jewish Legal society JLS seeks to create a community for Jewish law students, their spouses, partners, children, friends, or those of Jewish heritage. JLS is active in a variety of ways including, on campus ethical education, international law, religious and interfaith programming.

Latino Law Society: LLS serves to promote the recruitment and retention of Latino students, to promote unity among the Latino students, and to promote awareness and understanding in the law school and the community of Latino perspectives, culture, heritage, and issues.

Minority Law Student Association: MLSA promotes diversity at Lewis & Clark and in the Oregon legal community by hosting events on minority issues and providing a network for students. MLSA sponsors speakers, mentoring opportunities, and a variety of networking and social events.

National Lawyers Guild: NLG strives to support activists by providing legal observers to document violations of freedom of expression at events and rallies, to present Know Your Rights Trainings to students and the community, to be a radical presence on campus and to continue to work for human rights in new ways.

Native American Law Student Association: NALSA's goals are to educate the Lewis & Clark Community about legal issues affecting Native American and Alaskan Native communities, promote the study of Federal Indian law, and encourage interaction with local tribes.

Northwest Environmental Defense Center: NEDC provides legal support to individuals and grassroots environmental organizations and engages in litigation independently or in conjunction with other environmental groups. In October, NEDC hosts a retreat for members and volunteers, where students are introduced to environmental legal issues.

OUTLAW: OutLaw provides a forum for gays, lesbians, bisexuals, transgendered, questioning students and their allies to meet, exchange ideas, share experiences, and bring pertinent legal and political issues of the LGBT community to campus.

Secular Legal Society: SLS provides a venue for students at Lewis & Clark Law School, practicing attorneys, scholars and community leaders to discuss and debate both secular and non-secular legal theories, philosophies, and issues in addition to promoting and creating awareness of secular humanism.

Student Advocates for Business & Environmental Responsibility: SABER's goal is twofold: to advocate for incentive-driven solutions to environmental and economic issues and to provide a collaborative, career-focused atmosphere for our members.

Student Animal Legal Defense Fund: SALDF coordinates opportunities for animal law pro bono work, community service, and activism, and holds many informative and celebratory events throughout the year that promote critical thinking about the relationship of animals to humans and exploration of legal duties to the animals in those relationships.

Students for International Environmental Law: SIEL's mission is to promote education and collaboration on issues of international environmental law within local, national, and global communities.

Students for Sensible Drug Policy: SSDP creates safe spaces to have open, critical, and honest conversation about drug policy reform, works to educate fellow law students and the greater Portland community about drug policy reform issues.

Student Trial Lawyers Association: STLA is committed to fostering interest in the variety of trial practice careers that exist in the legal profession and educating students about how best to prepare for a career as a trial lawyer.

Women's Law Caucus: Women's Law Caucus seeks to bring together the community of Lewis and Clark students interested in exploring the wide spectrum of legal issues affecting women.

August 6, 2018