ABA Section of Antitrust Law | Chair's Message

A Message From The Chair

KEYNOTE SPEAKER ANNOUNCEMENT

William MacLeodIldefonso Guajardo Villarreal, Mexico's Minister of Economy, will be the leadoff speaker at the American Bar Association's fourth biennial Antitrust in the Americas Conference on June 1 in Mexico City, Mexico.  

Ildefonso Guajardo VillarrealMinister Guajardo has overseen the sweeping reforms to Mexico's competition law and agencies that formed a capstone of President Enrique Peña Nieto's economic reforms. As Minister of Economy, he will be a key figure in any renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Hear Minister Guajardo and many other leading officials and practitioners from the region, including Alexandre Cordeiro Macedo, Esteban Greco, Felipe Irarrazabal, Deborah Platt Majoras, Alejandra Palacios, Javier Tapia, and Hon. Diane Wood at Antitrust in the Americas Conference in Mexico City on June 1-2, 2017 at the Four Seasons in the Polanco district. Registration is still available.

Alejandra Palacios PrietoSome of the most impressive initiatives, methods, accomplishments and energy came out of the countries that will convene in Mexico at Antitrust in the Americas.   We will hear about COFECE's research in sectors such as air transport, trucking, telecom, gasoline and finance - now resulting in reports, recommendations and actions that have earned international respect and awards.  Monopoly and cartel cases are cultivating efficiencies, creating jobs and cutting prices.  COFECE President Alejandra Palacios and her staff have called on companies doing business in Mexico to adopt a culture of competition.  They will share their messages with us. 

Similar calls have come from other countries as well.  In Brazil, CADE enforcers just accused the state-owned postal company of attempting to extend its monopoly.  Chile's new merger guidelines will take effect the day we meet.  Both countries have moved from post-merger to pre-merger notification systems, and both have intensified their cartel attacks.  Argentina is also modernizing its merger review.  Colombia and Peru have rapidly developed sophisticated antitrust institutions, which are now ramping up.

In short, enterprise is on the rise, cartels are on the run, and opportunities abound from Cape Horn to Canada.  Aggressive enforcement and competition advocacy have altered the legal landscape, and we all need new maps if we want to navigate safely through it.  For a thorough briefing on effective practice in a dynamic region, for a first-hand account from the officials that are changing our practice, join Barra Mexicana, IBRAC and SAL at Antitrust in the Americas.

CLE will be available.  Tequila will be plentiful.  Enjoyment will be inevitable.  

See you in Mexico City!


Bill MacLeod
Chair, Section of Antitrust Law 2016-2017

Advertisement