Jan

    What Lies Beneath - Critical Minerals, National Security, and Supply Chains

    2 PM EST

    What Lies Beneath - Critical Minerals, National Security, and Supply Chains

    Non-fuel minerals like cobalt, graphite, rare earth elements, and tungsten fuel modern life. From consumer electronics, to electric vehicles, to medical devices, to defense articles, these and other minerals are essential to modern manufacturing. But the sources are fairly concentrated, rendering much of the world dependent on relatively few countries and supply chain intermediaries.

    Recognizing the strategic importance of critical minerals to the U.S. industrial base and continuing technological dominance, the Trump Administration has taken foundational legal and policy steps to reduce dependence on foreign sources of key minerals. In December 2017, the President issued an executive order that declared U.S. dependence on foreign source minerals a threat to "national security" and promulgated a "A Federal Strategy to Ensure Secure and Reliable Supplies of Critical Minerals." In May 2018, the Department of the Interior issued a list of minerals deemed “critical” for their necessity and degree of foreign source dependency. In addition, the Trump Administration has stated plans to scrutinize corruption in Africa’s extractives industries, which include, significantly, cobalt mining in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the world’s largest cobalt producer.

    Now that the Trump Administration has declared a policy to reduce dependency on foreign sources for critical minerals, how will the Administration go about achieving its stated objective? What legal consequences—including in the areas of national security, trade, anti-corruption, and environmental law—might flow? Our multi-disciplinary panel will discuss the science and practical importance of "critical minerals," recent and potential U.S. legal and policy developments, and the potential impacts of U.S. actions on minerals on manufacturing, supply chains, and the markets.

    Speakers:

    ·   Dr. Roderick Eggert, Chair in Mineral Economics at Colorado School of Mines, Deputy    Director of the Critical Materials Institute

    ·   Hdeel Abdelhady, Esq., MassPoint Legal and Strategy Advisory PLLC

    ·   Jared Wessel, Esq., Counsel, Hogan Lovells

     

    Sponsors:

    ·   Section of International Law

     

    Co-Sponsors:

    ·   MassPoint Legal and Strategy Advisory PLLC

    ·   International Trade Committee

    ·   Africa Committee

    ·   International Human Rights Committee

    ·   Central/East Asia & China Committee

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    What Lies Beneath - Critical Minerals, National Security, and Supply Chains

    Event Details

    Format

    Teleconference

    Date

    Jan 16, 2019

    2019-01-16T14:00:00-05:00 2019-01-16T15:30:00-05:00 What Lies Beneath - Critical Minerals, National Security, and Supply Chains

    What Lies Beneath - Critical Minerals, National Security, and Supply Chains

    Non-fuel minerals like cobalt, graphite, rare earth elements, and tungsten fuel modern life. From consumer electronics, to electric vehicles, to medical devices, to defense articles, these and other minerals are essential to modern manufacturing. But the sources are fairly concentrated, rendering much of the world dependent on relatively few countries and supply chain intermediaries.

    Recognizing the strategic importance of critical minerals to the U.S. industrial base and continuing technological dominance, the Trump Administration has taken foundational legal and policy steps to reduce dependence on foreign sources of key minerals. In December 2017, the President issued an executive order that declared U.S. dependence on foreign source minerals a threat to "national security" and promulgated a "A Federal Strategy to Ensure Secure and Reliable Supplies of Critical Minerals." In May 2018, the Department of the Interior issued a list of minerals deemed “critical” for their necessity and degree of foreign source dependency. In addition, the Trump Administration has stated plans to scrutinize corruption in Africa’s extractives industries, which include, significantly, cobalt mining in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the world’s largest cobalt producer.

    Now that the Trump Administration has declared a policy to reduce dependency on foreign sources for critical minerals, how will the Administration go about achieving its stated objective? What legal consequences—including in the areas of national security, trade, anti-corruption, and environmental law—might flow? Our multi-disciplinary panel will discuss the science and practical importance of "critical minerals," recent and potential U.S. legal and policy developments, and the potential impacts of U.S. actions on minerals on manufacturing, supply chains, and the markets.

    Speakers:

    ·   Dr. Roderick Eggert, Chair in Mineral Economics at Colorado School of Mines, Deputy    Director of the Critical Materials Institute

    ·   Hdeel Abdelhady, Esq., MassPoint Legal and Strategy Advisory PLLC

    ·   Jared Wessel, Esq., Counsel, Hogan Lovells

     

    Sponsors:

    ·   Section of International Law

     

    Co-Sponsors:

    ·   MassPoint Legal and Strategy Advisory PLLC

    ·   International Trade Committee

    ·   Africa Committee

    ·   International Human Rights Committee

    ·   Central/East Asia & China Committee

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