Oct

    Gundy v. United States: Does the Federal Sex Offender Registration Law Offend Nondelegation Principles?

    12 PM EDT

    On October 2, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Gundy v. United States, the first major case in nearly two decades to squarely consider the “nondelegation doctrine” — that is, the question of whether Congress has unconstitutionally “delegated” legislative power to the executive branch by enacting a statute without an “intelligible principle” sufficient to cabin the executive’s discretion.

    In this case, the petitioner challenges the federal Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (“SORNA”), which empowered the Attorney General to determine whether SORNA’s registration requirements would apply to persons who committed a sex offense before the law’s July 2006 enactment.

    To analyze the litigants’ arguments and the justices’ questions, and to look forward to the case’s possible ramifications, the ABA’s Section on Administrative Law and Regulatory Practice’s Judicial Review Committee welcomes Professors Cary Coglianese and Ronald Levin to this teleforum, moderated by Professor Adam White.

    Confirmed Panelists

    Cary Coglianese is the Edward B. Shils Professor of Law and Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Penn Program on Regulation, at the University of Pennsylvania.

    Ronald Levin is the William R. Orthwein Distinguished Professor of Law at the Washington University in St. Louis School of Law.

    Adam White is an Assistant Professor of Law at the George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School, director of the Scalia Law School’s C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State, and a research fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution.

    Open to ABA members and the general public.

    NO CLE Credit is available for this program.
    There is no cost associated with this program, but registration is required.

    $0
    NON-MEMBERS
    $0
    MEMBERS
    Register Now *Additional discounts may apply at checkout

    Log In to view your rate

    Gundy v. United States: Does the Federal Sex Offender Registration Law Offend Nondelegation Principles?

    Event Details

    Format

    Teleconference

    Date

    Oct 10, 2018

    2018-10-10T12:00:00-04:00 2018-10-10T13:30:00-04:00 Gundy v. United States: Does the Federal Sex Offender Registration Law Offend Nondelegation Principles?

    On October 2, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Gundy v. United States, the first major case in nearly two decades to squarely consider the “nondelegation doctrine” — that is, the question of whether Congress has unconstitutionally “delegated” legislative power to the executive branch by enacting a statute without an “intelligible principle” sufficient to cabin the executive’s discretion.

    In this case, the petitioner challenges the federal Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (“SORNA”), which empowered the Attorney General to determine whether SORNA’s registration requirements would apply to persons who committed a sex offense before the law’s July 2006 enactment.

    To analyze the litigants’ arguments and the justices’ questions, and to look forward to the case’s possible ramifications, the ABA’s Section on Administrative Law and Regulatory Practice’s Judicial Review Committee welcomes Professors Cary Coglianese and Ronald Levin to this teleforum, moderated by Professor Adam White.

    Confirmed Panelists

    Cary Coglianese is the Edward B. Shils Professor of Law and Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Penn Program on Regulation, at the University of Pennsylvania.

    Ronald Levin is the William R. Orthwein Distinguished Professor of Law at the Washington University in St. Louis School of Law.

    Adam White is an Assistant Professor of Law at the George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School, director of the Scalia Law School’s C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State, and a research fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution.

    Open to ABA members and the general public.

    NO CLE Credit is available for this program.
    There is no cost associated with this program, but registration is required.

    Sponsors

    Section of Administrative Law and Regulatory Practice

    Related Products

    Related On-Demand CLE