Oct

    Is 'Direct' Really Correct? Bricks, Tix, Kicks, and Apps after Apple v. Pepper

    12 PM EDT

    Illinois Brick’s direct purchaser rule says only “the overcharged direct purchaser, and not others in the chain of manufacture or distribution” can sue. How does the rule apply to online marketplaces, transaction platforms, or two-sided markets? Can contracts protect firms? A Supreme Court decision in Apple v. Pepper may help decide. A panel below held that iPhone users who purchase apps through the App Store can sue Apple because it is an app distributor. Is this an exception to the Illinois Brick rule, or a straightforward application of the rule? Join us to discuss important questions raised and litigation or contract strategies that might be used to protect your company or your claim.

    FREE:  Antitrust Section Members, Government, Non-profit Employees, Students
    $25.00 Other Non-Members.

    Explore Section benefits or call 1-800-285-2221 to join. Code RAT14IP25.   For this and all upcoming events visit http://ambar.org/atevents.
     
    CLE
    The ABA is not seeking CLE credit for this program.

    Audio Archive: Provided all releases are obtained, MP3 recordings of this program will be available to Section members on the Committee Program Audio page.

     


     

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    Is 'Direct' Really Correct? Bricks, Tix, Kicks, and Apps after Apple v. Pepper

    Event Details

    Format

    Teleconference

    Date

    Oct 02, 2018

    2018-10-02T12:00:00-04:00 2018-10-02T13:00:00-04:00 Is 'Direct' Really Correct? Bricks, Tix, Kicks, and Apps after Apple v. Pepper

    Illinois Brick’s direct purchaser rule says only “the overcharged direct purchaser, and not others in the chain of manufacture or distribution” can sue. How does the rule apply to online marketplaces, transaction platforms, or two-sided markets? Can contracts protect firms? A Supreme Court decision in Apple v. Pepper may help decide. A panel below held that iPhone users who purchase apps through the App Store can sue Apple because it is an app distributor. Is this an exception to the Illinois Brick rule, or a straightforward application of the rule? Join us to discuss important questions raised and litigation or contract strategies that might be used to protect your company or your claim.

    FREE:  Antitrust Section Members, Government, Non-profit Employees, Students
    $25.00 Other Non-Members.

    Explore Section benefits or call 1-800-285-2221 to join. Code RAT14IP25.   For this and all upcoming events visit http://ambar.org/atevents.
     
    CLE
    The ABA is not seeking CLE credit for this program.

    Audio Archive: Provided all releases are obtained, MP3 recordings of this program will be available to Section members on the Committee Program Audio page.

     


     

    Speakers

    Emilio Varanini

    Office of the Attorney General

    Eva Cole

    Winston & Strawn LLP

    Janet Netz

    ApplEcon

    William Reiss

    Robins Kaplan LLP

    Sponsors

    Pricing Conduct

    Section of Antitrust Law

    Co-sponsors

    Civil Practice and Procedure

    Moderators

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