Nov

    Competition Policy and Economics: What’s Gender Got to Do With it?

    Morrison & Foerster LLP, 8:30 AM EST

    Join us for an exciting half-day session where we will explore the ties between gender and competition policy and economics. We’ll have opening remarks from Commissioner Rebecca Slaughter and hear from international and domestic speakers (including from the OECD and Competition Bureau) about the work being done to consider the need for a “gender lens” in competition enforcement and policy. We’ll also discuss whether traditional antitrust economics has built-in biases and whether we need to rethink our analysis of markets or harms.

    Please note that you can register for the teleconference component here.

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    Panel 1: Gender and Competition Policy: What's Gender Got to do With it - 8:30am to 10:00am.

    To date, competition policy has been assumed to be largely gender blind and prides itself on the reliance upon objective economic principles. However, the OECD has recently been considering whether applying a gender lens might in fact help make competition policy even more objective by identifying additional relevant features of the relevant features of the relevant market, and of the behavior of consumers and firms. How can we apply a gender lens to traditional competition law considerations? In addition, while we know that having increased female representation on a company's board of directors may improve a company's overall financial results, what is the impact on the competitiveness of the firm and competition compliance? If the "glass ceiling is just another cartel" - is antitrust another tool that can crack it?

    Moderator:

    Anita Banicevic, Davies Ward

    Speakers:

    Ellen Creighton, Competition Bureau

    Lisa Phelan, Morrison & Foerster LLP

    Chris Pike, OECD

    Sandy Walker, Dentons

    Panel 2: Economics of Antitrust Analysis and Policy: the Relevance of Gender - 10:20am - 11:50am

    It has been said that unconscious gender bias is prevalent, but has it also been built into antitrust economics? For instance, if research has shown that gender influences the price that consumers pay, should we be defining the relevant antitrust markets for men and women separately? Or is this a distinction without a substantive difference? Similarly, if a company can discriminate between the price it charges between males and females, does this mean that we should analyses the market harms differently? Similarly, if antitrust agencies are looking at labor monopsony issues raised by mergers (or otherwise), should the nature of the jobs be taken into account? Are there any other relevant and gender-specific considerations that should be taken into account when thinking about the economics of antitrust?

    Moderator:

    Liz Bailey, NERA

    Speakers:

    Judit Fabian, University of Ottawa

    Vandy Howell, Cornerstone

    Margaret Sanderson, CRA

    Estefania Santacreu-Vasut, ESSEC Business School

    Please note that this teleconference is co-sponsored by the ABA Antittust Law Section's Women's Initiative and the Canadian Bar Association Competition Law Section

    Explore Section benefits or call 1-800-285-2221 to join.

    To learn more: https://www.americanbar.org/groups/antitrust_law/ CLE The ABA is not seeking CLE credit for this program. Audio Archive: Provided all releases are obtained, audio recordings of this program will be available to Section members on the Committee Program Audio page.

    Event Details

    Format

    In-Person

    Date

    Nov 19, 2019

    2019-11-19T08:30:00-05:00 2019-11-19T12:00:00-05:00 Competition Policy and Economics: What’s Gender Got to Do With it?

    Join us for an exciting half-day session where we will explore the ties between gender and competition policy and economics. We’ll have opening remarks from Commissioner Rebecca Slaughter and hear from international and domestic speakers (including from the OECD and Competition Bureau) about the work being done to consider the need for a “gender lens” in competition enforcement and policy. We’ll also discuss whether traditional antitrust economics has built-in biases and whether we need to rethink our analysis of markets or harms.

    Please note that you can register for the teleconference component here.

    Morrison & Foerster LLP

    Speakers

    Estefania Santacreu-Vasut

    ESSEC Business School

    Judit Fabian

    University of Ottawa

    Lisa Phelan

    Morrison & Foerster LLP

    Margaret Sanderson

    Charles River Associates

    Sandra Walker

    Dentons

    Vandy Howell

    Cornerstone Research
    VANDY M. HOWELL, PhD

    Vandy Howell received her PhD in economics from MIT. She has expertise in industrial organization and labor economics. She is the head of Cornerstone Research’s San Francisco office. Dr. Howell’s practice area focus has been on antitrust, intellectual property, marketing, and breach of contract matters. She has experience across many industries, including cases involving technological and innovation markets, agriculture, and labor market issues.

    Dr. Howell has applied economic theory to complicated market settings and has developed complex models using econometric techniques. She has consulted on many high-profile antitrust cases, such as High Fructose Corn Syrup Antitrust Litigation; Vitamins Antitrust Litigation; Compensation of Managerial, Professional & Technical Employees Antitrust Litigation; Southeast Milk Antitrust Litigation; E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company v. Monsanto Company; Rambus Inc. v. Micron Technology, Inc., et al.; and Thales Avionics, Inc. v. Matsushita Avionics Systems Corporation.

    Dr. Howell has consulted on class certification matters, and she coauthored the study “Economics of Class Certification in Indirect Purchaser Antitrust Cases,” published in Competition, the Journal of the Antitrust and Unfair Competition Law Section of the California State Bar. In addition, she has taught industrial organization and public policy at the University of California, Berkeley.

    Sponsors

    Membership, Diversity & Inclusion Committee

    Section of Antitrust Law

    Co-sponsors

    Canadian Bar Association

    Moderators

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