AI & Robotics

Schedule

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Keynote Speakers

Day One
Prof. J. Christian Gerdes, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering & Director, Stanford Center for Automotive Research (CARS), Dynamic Design Lab & Revs Program (formerly Chief Innovation Officer, U.S. Department of Transportation)

Day Two
Brigadier General R. Patrick Huston
Assistant Judge Advocate General, U.S. Army

Thursday, January 9

Day One: The Verticals

8:00-9:00am | Registration and Continental Breakfast

9:00-9:15am | Chair’s Welcome, Logistics, and Announcements

Institute Chair: Stephen S. Wu, Silicon Valley Law Group, San Jose, CA

9:15-10:15am | Introduction to the Legal Issues of AI & Robotics

The rise of artificial intelligence and robotics in a number of industries and sectors is posing significant challenges for both companies and the agencies that regulate them. The news media are filled with stories about the threats of AI, and how society should respond to AI challenges is one of the most hotly contested debates today. Product developers, companies, lawyers and regulators are struggling with the swift pace of change and determining the most effective way to regulate and govern robots and AI systems. Specific issues include protecting the public from the premature deployment and marking of immature technologies, the scope of human responsibility for AI behavior, how to make AI accountable for its own actions, and how to regulate non‐human behavior. This panel will provide an overview of the technologies, the developments giving rise to the AI and robotics revolution, and the areas of legal practice affecting AI and robotics, such as compliance, transactions, liability, investigations, and governance.

Jimmy Kim, Built Robotics, San Francisco, CA
Giancarlo Mori, Movyl Technologies, San Francisco, CA
Christopher J. Savoie, Zapata Computing Inc, Boston, MA
Stephen S. Wu, Silicon Valley Law Group, San Jose, CA [Moderator]

10:15-11:15am | AI, Automation, and the Future of Transportation

Highly automated vehicles have the potential to dramatically reduce the frequency and severity of accidents. Aerial drones and more exotic forms of transportation systems are now under discussion to enhance mobility. Despite the potential benefits, automated transportation systems potentially expose manufacturers to a wide variety of safety, cybersecurity, and systemic risks. Future transportation modes will rely on complex algorithms to predict the movements of other vehicles, pedestrians, and other stationary objects and react accordingly. This panel will cover the liability and insurance implications of AI‐fueled future transportation modes.

Nandi Chhabra, Peloton Technology, Mountain View, CA
Selina Pan, Toyota Research Institute, Los Altos, CA
Phillip Zackler, Toyota Research Institute, Los Altos, CA

11:30am-12:30pm | AI and Robots in the Healthcare Setting

AI has the potential of revolutionizing healthcare, including by assisting in differential diagnosis of illness, scanning images to detect disease (better than human doctors), predicting outcomes, and suggesting treatment options. Robots in the operating room assist human doctors in performing surgeries more precisely with better outcomes and fewer complications. Service robots in hospitals, clinics, and nursing homes may perform logistical tasks to support healthcare operations. This panel will discuss compliance and effects of AI and robotics on accreditation, malpractice and product liability implications, system procurement issues, and implementation best practices.

Prof. Christopher P. Hess, MD, PhD, University of California, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA
Stephen Mutkoski, Microsoft Corporation, Mountain View, CA
Marissa R. Urban, Google, Mountain View, CA

12:30-1:30pm | Lunch

1:30-2:30pm | AI in Financial Services

Increasingly, FinTech companies are employing AI to solve customer issues at financial institutions. From artificial intelligence applications to track customer account activity and customer spending and investing decisions, to fraud detection and underwriting of loans, AI is becoming more prevalent. While artificial intelligence holds the promise of efficiency and better decision‐making, the potential for liability is growing. How are banks, investment firms, insurance companies, and other financial services firms preparing for and managing AI‐related liabilities within their organizations?

Laura O. I. Lemire, Microsoft Cloud and AI, Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA
Deon Woods Bell, U.S. Federal Trade Commission, Office of International Affairs, Washington, DC
Theodore F. Claypoole, Womble Bond Dickinson LLP, Atlanta, GA [Moderator]

2:30-3:30pm | Ethics of the Use of AI in the Practice of Law

AI and robotics have the potential to help solve some of the world's most challenging social problems, including saving lives lost to traffic accidents, diagnosing cancer, and aiding disaster‐relief efforts. These technologies also raise important societal and ethical concerns, including algorithmic discrimination and job displacement. This panel will discuss some of the significant issues raised by the tension between AI for the global good and potential harmful impacts of AI. The panel will also examine the intersection between law and ethics, including the legal implications of pursuing what might be perceived as “ethical” design choices.

Adam Nguyen, ebrevia, San Francisco, CA
Prof. Drew Simshaw, Gonzaga University School of Law, Spokane, WA
Rafael Baca, R Baca Law Firm PLLC, Palo Alto, CA [Moderator]

3:45-4:45pm | AI and Robots in the Workplace

The world will see the widescale deployment of robots in the workplace that will work side by side with human workers. We can learn from the experiences with industrial robots in automobile factories and tool and die plants to understand the new robot‐filled workplace. In addition, artificial intelligence systems are helping recruiters and human resource professionals hire and manage an enterprise’s workforce. Such systems, however, entail the possibility of algorithmic bias that may expose employers to liability under employment laws. Moreover, ever greater amounts of data upon hiring and gathered by workplace systems may make employment practices ever more intrusive. This panel will discuss the labor and employment law compliance issues with employers using robots and AI systems.

Natalie A. Pierce, Littler Mendelson PC, San Francisco, CA
R. Jason Straight, Ankura, New York, NY
Austin Tarango, Google AI, San Francisco, CA

4:45-5:00pm | Preview of Day Two

Chair: Stephen S. Wu, Silicon Valley Law Group, San Jose, CA

5:00-5:45pm | Keynote Speaker

Prof. J. Christian Gerdes, PhD, Professor of Mechanical Engineering & Director, Stanford Center for Automotive Research (CARS), Dynamic Design Lab & Revs Program (formerly Chief Innovation Officer, U.S. Department of Transportation) 

5:45-6:45pm | Networking Reception (with special guest "Niki") 

Friday, January 10

Day Two: Cross-cutting Issues

8:00-8:30am | Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:30-9:30am | Data Privacy, Data Security, and Information Governance

The capabilities of AI and machine learning technologies and the sheer amount of data they collect are growing rapidly. Big Data and AI together provide ever more effective and intrusive ways of understanding people and their behavior. At the same time, AI is becoming a more powerful tool for both cybercriminals and information security professionals tasked with protecting sensitive data and critical infrastructure. Companies are facing the challenges from compliance with the now‐effective European Union General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in Europe and preventing mega‐scale data breaches, such as the Equifax breach announced in September 2017. The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) will change business practices in the United States. Congress may preempt CCPA with federal data protection legislation. This panel will discuss how global companies are approaching the complexities of AI and robotics in light of GDPR, CCPA, possible federal legislation, and GDPR‐influenced international laws.

Ian Ballon, Greenberg Traurig LLP, Silicon Valley, CA
Kristen Madigan, Crowell & Moring LLP, Washington, DC
Lucy L. Thomson, Livingston PLLC, Washington, DC
Ruth Hill Bro, Privacy and Cybersecurity Attorney, Chicago, IL [Moderator]

9:30-10:30am | Civil and Human Rights Implications of AI

Given the greater intrusiveness of Big Data and its enablement of a possible Big Brother scenario, academics and regulators are beginning to look and AI and Big Data as challenges to human rights and Constitutional protections. Out of a human rights perspective, GDPR specifically provides for a right of an individual to an explanation of decisions reached by automated processing of personal data and the right to human intervention. This panel will provide an overview of developments in international human rights law and Constitutional law scholarship bearing on artificial intelligence and robotics. It will also discuss litigation seeking to assert the rights of non‐human animals and the possible impact of that litigation on non‐human artificial intelligences. 

Steve Crown, Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA
Prof. Jessica Fjeld, Cyberlaw Clinic of The Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
Prof. Vivek Krishnamurthy PhD, Samuelson-Glushko Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON

10:45-11:45am | Investigations in an Era of AI

The investigation of areas such as corrupt practices and insider trading will increasingly rely on Big Data and AI. AI can also help businesses detect corporate espionage and trade secret misappropriation in the workplace. In general, how can AI help catch wrongdoers? At the same time, investigators face the challenges of “deep fakes” and “fake news.” Generative AI systems can create artifacts that appear real and pose challenges to investigators seeking the truth. This panel will cover how the era of AI will change investigations, and how investigators can preserve the admissibility of evidence at hearings or in trial.

Serge Jorgensen, Sylint Group, Sarasota, FL
David K. A. Mordecai, PhD, Risk Economics Inc, New York, NY
Paul Starrett, Starrett Consulting Inc., Saratoga, CA

11:45am-12:15pm | Keynote Speaker

Brigadier General R. Patrick Huston, Assistant Judge Advocate General, U.S. Army

12:15-1:15pm | Lunch

1:15-2:15pm | Promoting the Progress in AI through IP

This panel covers special intellectual property issues involved with intellectual property. It will discuss the extent and scope of patent protection for AI inventions. Also, how can intellectual property law protect trained neural networks or data sets, if at all? What new licensing models, if any, are necessary for commercializing AI or robotics technologies or the data sets supporting them? This panel will also cover the intellectual property implications of AI‐created paintings, images, and music, and what happens if an AI creates a new invention? Who, if anyone, owns those works or inventions?

Brian S. Adams, QUALCOMM Technologies, Inc, San Diego, CA
Hogene Choi, Baker Botts LLP, Palo Alto, CA
Christian E. Mammen, DPhil. Womble Bond Dickinson LLP, Palo Alto, CA
Prof. Tyler Trent Ochoa, Santa Clara University School of Law, Santa Clara, CA
Colleen Chien, Santa Clara University School of Law, Santa Clara, CA [Moderator]

2:15-3:15pm | AI and Robotics Standards, Certifications, and Auditing

How can customers, users, and regulators trust AI systems and robots? How can they be sure that these systems will perform as promised? One potential solution relates to the use of industry standards creating frameworks to assess the effectiveness of AI systems and robots or their adherence to certain safety, ethics, privacy, or security criteria. Auditors or certification bodies would then review a company’s implementation of these criteria and issue audit reports or certifications that may provide comfort to potential purchasers, users, or regulators. This panel will cover the perspectives of a certified public accountant, a professional providing certifications, and a participant in standards-setting bodies to discuss the value of standards, certifications, and audits.

Eric Hibbard, Hitachi Vantara, Santa Clara, CA
Sumit Kalra, BPM, San Jose, CA

3:30-4:30pm | AI, Robotics, Ethics, and the Public Good

AI and robotics have the potential to help solve some of the world's most challenging social problems, including saving lives lost to traffic accidents, diagnosing cancer, and aiding disaster‐relief efforts. These technologies also raise important societal and ethical concerns, including algorithmic discrimination and job displacement. This panel will discuss some of the significant issues raised by the tension between AI for the global good and potential harmful impacts of AI. The panel will also examine the intersection between law and ethics, including the legal implications of pursuing what might be perceived as “ethical” design choices.

Ryan Budish, The Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
Theresa Harris, AAAS Scientific Responsibility, Human Rights and Law Program, Washington, DC
Prof. Shannon Vallor, PhD, Santa Clara University Department of Philosophy, Santa Clara, CA
Cynthia Cwik, Stanford Distinguished Careers Institute, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA [Moderator]

4:30-5:30pm | Looking into the Crystal Ball

In the longer run, we face challenges from artificial general intelligence (AGI) and quantum computing, although these technologies are at least decades away. If and when these technologies are widely available, what legal issues will arise? This panel will provide an overview of the promise, possibilities, and potential threats from AGI and quantum computing. It will then talk about potential tools for governance, including policies, procedures, and subordinate documentation to support safe and transparent use of these technologies.

Prof. Keith Abney, California Polytechnic State University Department of Philosophy, San Luis Obispo, CA
Ryan C. Clark, Baker Botts LLP, Palo Alto, CA
Daniel F. Dries, PhD, Psi Quantum, San Francisco, CA
Stephen S. Wu, Silicon Valley Law Group, San Jose, CA [Moderator]

 

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