Fall 2013: Human Trafficking

The Modern Abolitionist Movement: How Lawyers, Litigation, and Legislation Can Combat Trafficking in Persons

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The Modern Abolitionist Movement: How Lawyers, Litigation, and Legislation Can Combat Trafficking in Persons

Throughout U.S. history, the issue of slavery has troubled the minds and hearts of legal professionals. But in the modern era, there are new tools for lawyers who wish to take up this cause to bring traffickers to justice and assist their victims.

Because international law does not prohibit states from providing domestic remedies that impose tort liability upon corporations for extraterritorial conduct violating jus cogens norms, the Second Circuit should be reversed.

The Supreme Court has specifically adopted the statutory construction of federal statutes as presumptively against extraterritorial application. The presumption against extraterritorial application is binding and should apply with full force in the absence of a clear and affirmative expression of congressional intent to the contrary.

It is hard for many of us to believe that, in this day and age, human trafficking is such a vast, pervasive problem around the world. I am sure that you will be as inspired by these articles as I am to consider how we can use our skills to help fight this terrible scourge.

On June 14, 2013, a small group of ABA members headed to Capitol Hill to lobby their lawmakers about human rights in a first-ever ABA Human Rights Lobby Day. Organized by the SIL’s International Human Rights Committee (IHRC), our goal was to ask our members of Congress to take some specific actions on human rights.

Welcome to London. I hope you will want to savor just a few of London’s delights and return to enjoy more.

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