How Courts Work

Mediation

What Is Mediation?

Mediation brings people in conflict together with a neutral third person who assists them in reaching a voluntary agreement. The mediator helps them clarify the issues, consider options, and reach a workable settlement that fits their needs.

Here’s a classic example of how mediation works. The kitchen has one orange, and two cooks need it. One cook wants orange juice for a fruit drink and the other needs orange rind for cake icing. The mediator helps them discover their real interests (orange juice and orange rind) as opposed to their stated needs (the orange). The problem can be reframed into “who gets the orange at what time.” If the second cook gets the orange after the juice has been squeezed out, both can satisfy their real interests.

>>What Is Mediation?
>>What Is the Relationship between Mediation and the Law?
>>What Are the Advantages to Mediation?
>>What Are the Processes Involved?
>>In What Cases Might Mediation Be Used?
>>How Can I Choose a Mediator?


How Courts Work Home | Courts and Legal Procedure | Steps in a Trial
The Human Side of Being a Judge | *Mediation*

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