The Law and Your Job

Major Federal Laws

How do I know if an action is discriminatory in violation of the law?

First, not all discriminatory actions are forbidden by law. The law only prohibits discrimination when it is based on a person's protected status—race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age or disability under federal law.

Thus, if an employer makes a decision because of an employee's race, that employer has engaged in prohibited discrimination. Paying a worker lower wages than other employees because that worker is an African-American black violates Title VII. But paying a worker lower wages than other employees because that worker is performing different kinds of job duties does not violate Title VII. The question is whether the reason for the difference in treatment is based on the employee's protected status. Different treatment based on protected status is called intentional discrimination or disparate treatment.

>>What are the major federal anti-discrimination laws?
>>What aspects of the employment relationship are regulated by these laws?
>>What types of employers are regulated under Title VII?
>>How do I know if an action is discriminatory in violation of the law?
>>What should I do if I think I have been discriminated against in violation of the law?
>>How does someone file a charge under federal law?
>>What is the Age Discrimination in Employment Act?
>>What types of employers are regulated under the ADEA?
>>Is there a federal agency responsible for enforcing the ADEA?
>>What is Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act?
>>What is a “disability”?
>>What types of employers are regulated under the ADA?
>>Is there a federal agency responsible for enforcing the ADA?


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*Major Federal Laws* | Sexual Harassment

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