Child Custody and Support

Deciding Factors in Awarding Child Custody

What happens when one parent tries to undermine the child’s relationship with other parent?

Most states declare a specific policy favoring an ongoing, healthy relationship between the child and both parents. If one parent is trying to undermine the child’s relationship with the other parent, that is a negative factor against the parent who is trying to hurt the relationship. If other factors are close to equal, a court may grant custody to the parent who is more likely to encourage an open and good relationship with the other parent.

Similarly, if a custodial parent regularly interferes with visitation, that is a negative factor against the custodial parent and can lead to modification of custody to the noncustodial parent (assuming the noncustodial parent is able to properly care for the child).

>>What are the main child custody options?
>>Are mothers or fathers more likely to be awarded custody?
>>Is the child’s preference for one parent or another considered?
>>What happens when one parent tries to undermine the child’s relationship with other parent?
>>What if a parent is having nonmarital sexual relations?
>>Can gay parents be awarded custody?


Practical Law Home | Child Custody & Support Home | *Deciding Factors in Awarding Child Custody*
Issues Surrounding Visitation | Setting Guidelines for Child Support
Adjusting Child Custody Arrangements or the Amount of Child Support

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