Personal Injury

Investigating the Rights of Youths

Take Action! —Should Minors Have Access to Violent Video Games?

1. Conversations, speeches, letters, books, songs, posters, movies, videos, board games, sports, Web sites, and e-mail are all considered speech under the Constitution. According to the federal judge in Interactive Digital Software Association v. St. Louis County, which forms of speech in this listing are not protected by the First Amendment? In your opinion what, if any, properties do these forms of speech have that would differentiate them from the others, which are protected by the First Amendment? Based on this examination of your own thinking, which decision would you be more likely to support, that of the federal judge in Interactive Digital or that of the U.S. appeals court in American Amusement Machine Association v. Kendrick?

2. Find out about one scholar's view regarding the harm caused to young people by exposure to violent media in Vicarious Violence on the Screen: A Challenge to Educators and Families. What media are you exposed to? Think of two or three violent programs that you or your friends have seen in these media. Do you find it likely that programs such as these will influence your behavior or that of your friends? Why or why not? If so, in what ways?

3. Starting on page 7 of Vicarious Violence on the Screen, find and visit Web sites of organizations trying to protect young people from violent media. Select an organization you feel you can support, and then contact it to investigate ways that you can assist the organization in its efforts.


Student Central | Students in Action | Investigating the Rights of Youths
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*Federal Courts at Odds: Should Minors Have Access to Violent Video Games?*